Kalamata, Open air train museum

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In Kalamata exists the biggest open air museum of trains of Greece.

(C. Theodorou)


Kalamata (Greek: Καλαμάτα Kalamáta, formerly Καλάμαι Kalámai) is the second most populous city of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece and the largest city of the homonymous administrative region. The capital and chief port of the Messenia regional unit, it lies along the Nedon River at the head of the Messenian Gulf.

The 2011 census recorded 69,849 inhabitants for the wider Kalamata Municipality, of which 62,409 in the municipal unit of Kalamata proper. Kalamata is renowned as the land of the Kalamatianos dance and of the Kalamata olives.

The history of Kalamata begins with Homer, who mentions Pharai, an ancient city built more or less where the Kalamata Castle stands today. It was believed that during ancient times the area that the city presently occupies was covered by the sea, but the proto-Greek and archaic period remains (Poseidon temple) that were unearthed at Akovitika region prove the opposite.

Pherai was rather unimportant in antiquity, and the site continued in obscurity until middle Byzantine times. Kalamata is first mentioned in the 10th-century Life of St. Nikon the Metanoeite, and experienced a period of prosperity in the 11th–12th centuries, as attested by the five surviving churches built in this period, including the Church of the Holy Apostles, as well as the comments of the Arab geographer al-Idrisi, who calls it a "large and populous" town.

Following the Fourth Crusade, Kalamata was conquered by Frankish Crusaders under William of Champlitte and Geoffrey of Villehardouin, in 1205, when its Byzantine fortress was apparently in so bad a state that it could not be defended. Thus the town became part of the Principality of Achaea, and after Champlitte granted its possession to Geoffrey of Villehardouin, the town was the heart of the Villehardouins' patrimony in the Principality; Prince William II of Villehardouin was born and died there. After William II's death in 1278, Kalamata remained in the hands of his widow, Anna Komnene Doukaina, but when she remarried to Nicholas II of Saint Omer, King Charles of Anjou was loath to see this important castle in the hands of a vassal, and in 1282 Anna exchanged it with lands elsewhere in Messenia.

The town was attacked and sacked in 1293 and 1295 by Slavs from the neighbouring mountains, but in 1298 it formed the dowry of Princess Matilda of Hainaut upon her marriage to Guy II de la Roche. Matilda retained Kalamata as her fief until 1322, when she was dispossessed and the territory reverted to the princely domain. In 1358, Prince Robert gifted the châtellenie of Kalamata (comprising also Port-de-Jonc and Mani) to his wife, Marie de Bourbon, who kept it until her death in 1377. The town remained one of the largest in the Morea—a 1391 document places it, with 300 hearths, on par with Glarentza—but it nevertheless declined in importance throughout the 14th and 15th centuries in favour of other nearby sites like Androusa. Kalamata remained in Frankish hands until near the end of the Principality of Achaea, coming under the control of the Byzantine Despotate of the Morea only in 1428.

Kalamata was occupied by the Ottomans from 1481 to 1685, like the rest of Greece. In 1659, during the long war between Ottomans and Venetians over Crete, the Venetian commander Francesco Morosini, came into contact with the rebellious Maniots, for a joint campaign in the Morea, in the course of which he took Kalamata. He was soon after forced to return to Crete, but the Venetians returned in the Morean War.

The Venetian Republic ruled Klamata from 1685 as part of the "Kingdom of the Morea" (Italian: Regno di Morea). During the Venetian occupation the city was fortified, developed and thrived economically. However, the Ottomans reoccupied Kalamata in the war of 1715 and controlled it until the Greek War of Independence.

Kalamata was the first city to be liberated as the Greeks rose in the Greek War of Independence. On 23 March 1821, it was taken over by the Greek revolutionary forces under the command of generals Theodoros Kolokotronis, Petros Mavromichalis and Papaflessas. However, in 1825, the invading Ibrahim Pasha destroyed the city.

In independent Greece, Kalamata was rebuilt and became one of the most important ports in the Mediterranean sea. It is not surprising that the second-oldest Chamber of Commerce in the Mediterranean, after that of Marseille, exists in Kalamata.

During World War II On 29 April 1941, a battle was fought near the port between the invading German forces and the 2nd New Zealand Division, for which Jack Hinton was later awarded the Victoria Cross.

After World War II, and due to political issues, Kalamata, as well as most of the Peloponnese, was excluded from the government development plans in favour of north Greece. That was a major brake on the local economy, resulting in the decline of the port and hence the city. During the 1970s and 1980s, development and growth in Kalamata were unknown.

Kalamata was again in the news and headlines on Saturday, 13 September 1986, as an earthquake measured at almost 6.6 on the Richter scale. The earthquake, although, reported as "moderately strong", caused heavy damage and killed 20 people. Following this severe damage, the local authorities and individuals strained their financial resources to bring a wind of change to the forgotten capital of Messinia.

(From Wikipedia)

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Comments (118)

Der Burger JL on April 1

Für diese wunderbar fotografierte Museumseisenbahn...Like 69...Gruß Heinz

Christos Theodorou on April 1

Der Burger JL - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

eri kitrinaki on April 1

!!!Εξαιρετική α/μL&F

Christos Theodorou on April 1

eri kitrinaki - Ευχαριστώ θερμά για την επίσκεψη και το σχόλιο. Πολλά χαιρετίσματα

Guizel J.c on April 2

Beautiful B/W image and train

LIKE

Friendly greetings-j.c

Christos Theodorou on April 2

Guizel J.c - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

Falk Preusche on April 3

Good picture in b/w from the old train. Like. Greetings Falk

Christos Theodorou on April 3

Falk Preusche - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

Lalakukk on April 3

Very good shot of a old rail motor car. Interesting place. like. Regards : Lala

Christos Theodorou on April 3

Lalakukk - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

Luppo Lui on April 26

Whow, an interesting train there!

L

cheers from Budapest

Christos Theodorou on April 26

Luppo Lui - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

gezginruh on April 29

Hi Christos Theodorou,

It looks so nice... Thank you for the information.

LK 75

Best greetings. GGR

Christos Theodorou on April 29

gezginruh - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

SD34 on May 10

Very nice train museum. Nice shot.

☆☆Favorite+L!☆☆

With all good wishes,SD34

Christos Theodorou on May 10

SD34 - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athen

Transporte donde la historia no se baja. Saludos desde Puerto rico, mi isla del encanto. Like 77.

Christos Theodorou on June 25

Ricardo David Jusino Rosario - Many thanks for your visit and comments – Best regards from Athens

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on March 22
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Christos Theodorou
    • Camera: SONY DSLR-A350
    • Taken on 2014/02/02 13:25:12
    • Exposure: 0.004s (1/250)
    • Focal Length: 20.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/5.600
    • ISO Speed: ISO200
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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