St Michaels Churchyard, Ingram

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Comments (17)

trikermike on October 8, 2008

What a wonderful grave matker,does it give details of how this person spent their life?

I get thhe impression they may have been good at ten-pin bowling, skittles.

I love the moss and lichen on the stone, growing since 1914.

skida another well observrd picture, thankyuo.

_Mike**

skida on October 8, 2008

Cheers Mike. I did take a shot or the front or read the inscription I'm afraid. I just liked the organic feel the stanes gave and had to get this shot.

skida on October 8, 2008

edit: "".......did not take a shot........"

Sue Allen on October 18, 2008

I was about to say it as organic, but then I spotted that you had aleady said that and I've had quite a day of being an unwitting plaguerist, so I'll say I love the smooth roundedness of them, they are very touch feely, in a word, yep, I'm going to have to say it.....organic! There's no better word.

sue

skida on October 18, 2008

Organic is a good word Sue and I'm happy to share it with you. The stones were good to touch too.

trikermike on October 19, 2008

If you zoom in on this pic of these 'stones' you can see some inscription, seems to be a memorial, or grave marker-datrd1914?

I'd like to know more about the person it commemorates, if possible.

A great shot of an unusal headstone, if that's what it is. Lays the truth to your feelings re walking through church yards &etc., yo two!

Mike

skida on October 19, 2008

I was fascinated when I saw it as I have never seen one like it before. The family name seems to be Armstrong and there are two names commemorated, the first in Dec 1914 (Great War?) and the second in 1951 (surviving wife?).

Now I am also fascinated and will have to go back and decipher it! Thanks Mike! :)

trikermike on October 19, 2008

skida I just wondered if the shape was a reflection on the gentlemans job or profession?

M b¬)

Sue Allen on October 19, 2008

Ha ha ha, tee hee, you've given me the giggles, Mike, how VERY disrespectful of you! I mean, do you think he was the fat conductor or something? ha ha ha, tee ,hee, belly ache, sorrry.......

Sue :D

skida on October 19, 2008

A sculptor in the Artists Rifles?

skida on April 9, 2009

We were wrong!

James Armstrong 1871-1914 and his wife Isabella (Tibbie) 1863-1951. He was described as "a well known and much esteemed Border Yeoman". They lived at High Blakehope, a remote farm high up the Breamish valley. The two boulders were taken from the river at High Blakehope. His sister-in-law, Elizabeth, has a similar headstone in Egligham chaurchyard.

It's amazing what you can discover in Blyth Library's local history section!

trikermike on April 9, 2009

Well, it's good to clear that mystery up, I was beginning to get rather troubled by the lack of information at my finger tip, Keith!

Mike

skida on April 9, 2009

Happy to help ;)

skida on April 9, 2009

Another factlet: The name Breamish comes from the Celtic words "breme", meaning furious, swelling or raging, and "uisge" meaning water (like whisky). A rather apt name considering how many times the roads and bridges have been washed away.

trikermike on April 10, 2009

Uisge beag

now yer talkin'

Haut wiscle....try that one, buddy boy!

skida on April 10, 2009

Haltwhistle: an anglicised version of the original words for high crest of water.

(Googled)

trikermike on April 10, 2009

CLOSE enough, but my spelling was off anyway!

hev yersel a canny day, marra...aam tryin te git this aal in one printor werkin,

seeyez on Satda!!

Mike

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on October 5, 2008
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by skida
    • Camera: EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY KODAK Z812 IS ZOOM DIGITAL CAMERA
    • Taken on 2008/10/05 16:06:17
    • Exposure: 0.025s (1/40)
    • Focal Length: 21.10mm
    • F/Stop: f/3.200
    • ISO Speed: ISO76
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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