Cranberries - Vaccinium macrocarpon

Not selected for Google Earth or Google Maps [?]

Comments (6)

Steve Paxton on October 25, 2008

you can not get an idea of the height of the bush from this shot?????

Bits-n-Pieces on October 25, 2008

hey steve - must be windy if you're up and online now on a Sunday morning! Thanks!!! Cranberries grow on a pretty low and prostrate plant - it stays under 6" or so in height, and in areas of wet lawn, can even grow there un-noticed almost like a weed. The next photo to the left shows a view over a bog. On one of the shots, did you see my link to the Cape Cod Cranberry Growers website? That's got a lot of great info.

Again, like with the Horseshoe crabs, so interesting to find out how things we take for granted are so unusual for others. Just like we're all fascinated with the idea of kangaroos jumping around free, and we can't imagine thinking of them as pests! (But then if we had one or two run loose - which actually does happen from time to time, I'm sure we'd change our minds.)

Steve Paxton on October 25, 2008

yes its early as its now day light saving no wind so will be going surfing but no camera waves are tooo big. yes i did look through the link most interesting to see the process and the map showing the whole area like it. nothing like that here at all. thanks for posting.

Jean Gregory Evans on October 25, 2008

The plants don't look like what I had envisioned. I thought sure it would be bushes about knee high. I have no idea why I thought that though. It is good to know the true story now. The plant is appealing to my eye. Looks like it could be used in flower gardens, like rock gardens or for a little something special here and there.

Thank you for the new knowledge!

Jean

Bits-n-Pieces on October 25, 2008

Jean - I was really surprised the first time I took a wetlands plant class, and as we were walking across a mown but sort of wet field, the instructor pointed out the cranberries mixed in with teh grasses. The plants look a lot like Bearberry (Arctosstaphylos uva-ursi), if you have that there. Though that's a sandy area plant, too, and cranberries are actually thinner/finer.

Jean Gregory Evans on October 25, 2008

No, doesn't look familiar at all. It would be fun to travel there and see this for myself. Perhaps one day I can do that! The first time I saw cranberry harvest or plants was a Martha Stewart show and I thought it was fascinating. You have a better presentation here than she did with video!

Very well done!

Jean

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on October 24, 2008
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Bits-n-Pieces
    • Camera: NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D60
    • Taken on 2008/10/11 15:40:26
    • Exposure: 0.025s (1/40)
    • Focal Length: 200.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/10.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO400
    • Exposure Bias: -0.33 EV
    • No flash

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