Pulp Mill Water Turbine

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (16)

Tom Lussier on February 19, 2009

Shenandoah Pulp Company. Opened in 1888, this pulp mill was outfitted with ten turbines which together developed more than 2,300 horsepower. These water wheels powered disc barking machines, shaking screens, wet press machines, and wood grinders which produced about 40 tons of “Spruce Ground Wood Pulp” daily. In 1935, the Shenandoah Pulp Company mill, heavily in debt and suffering financial hardship due to plummeting paper prices, simply closed. The structure was completely destroyed, with the exception of this massive stonework, in the flood of 1936 less than a year later.

The Shenandoah River's flow was rerouted through these structures to produce the power to run the factory. This rerouting of the Shenandoah spelled the end of the Harpers Ferry Mill Company's flour mill downstream. The river dam constructed to divert water to the pulp mill, drew water away fiom the flour mill's operations and significantly reduced their water power.

Any comments are always welcome, Tom

D.R.Lamont on February 19, 2009

nice new HDR set Tom!

Tom Lussier on February 19, 2009

Cheers Don. I had an HDR itch that needed scratching. :) ~Tom

★Dilyanka★ on February 20, 2009

Great reflection & interesting story Tom:)

Greetings from Bulgaria, DY

Ponpet on February 20, 2009

Interesting place Tom, like your special information about. Amazing to read.

Greetings from Munich Hans

laughingmackerel on February 20, 2009

strong graphic shot..great chunk of sky captured too

LM

Madidi on February 20, 2009

What a superb shot Tom, a wonderful new series of HDRs and the name of the company associated with this one conjours up all sorts of images. Great details in the timbers and reflections in the mill-race.

Best wishes,

Séan.

Al Sanin on February 20, 2009

Interesting picture Tom! and studying of your country! With a best wishes Al

Tom Lussier on February 20, 2009

Glad you both like the story as well as the image DY and Hans. :) Thank you very much.

Cheers LM. The ruins were impossible to walk by without trying to capture some of it's ageworn charm. I angled the lens down and over the edge a bit to get that reflection. (Keeping the strap around my neck to divert disaster) :)

Many thanks for your appreciation of this shot and the set Séan. There is so much you can do with multiple exposures that surpass the conventional capture as you are well aware. The shadows in this enclosure were so severe that this was my only recourse. :)

Thank you very much Al for those nice comments. Glad you appreciate the History as well.

Best regards to all,

Tom

Kintyre through a le… on February 21, 2009

Greetings Tom this image works really well in HDR and composition:)mossip

Tom Lussier on February 23, 2009

Extremely glad you like it mossip. Valued remarks from a gifted artist. :)

Best regards, Tom

filiz kulan on February 23, 2009

Hi Tom, interesting composition and good shot.Greetings, Filiz.

not1word on February 27, 2009

Thanks for the history lesson, Tom. It is a great cautionary tale to demonstrate that we often don't know the full results of what we do today on tomorrow, or others. Great shot to accompany it, too. : )

Tom Lussier on February 28, 2009

Thank you Filiz for the kind words.

Very happy to accompany images with history whenever possible not1word. If we don't learn from history we are doomed to repeat it. :) Thanks for the thoughts and comments.

Best regards, Tom

Fabrizio Fi on September 2, 2009

Molto bella.. molto bravo.. ciao

Tom Lussier on September 2, 2009

La ringrazio molto Fabrizio. Sono felice che vi piaccia. Saluti, Tom

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Tom Lussier
Lovettsville, Virginia USA

Photo details

  • Uploaded on February 19, 2009
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Tom Lussier
    • Camera: NIKON D300
    • Taken on 2009/02/16 02:55:25
    • Exposure: 0.100s (1/10)
    • Focal Length: 12.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/19.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO200

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