Fort Pulaski battlescars

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (15)

®mene on March 13, 2009

...i thought the damages came from the independence war against england but i just read that the battle happened during the civil war between the north and the south...

Very interesting - because in 2008 we (fam. n me) had a walk to St.Pauls Church in Norfolk (VA) that still contains the last english bullet fired on america. That was done by Lord Dunmore.

michael...

Leo Roundtree on March 13, 2009

Marilyn,

A very powerful image! I can only imagine what it would be like to be manning that cannon while the enemy cannonballs pound the walls beneath my feet.

Thank you for the picture and the history lesson.

Best wishes, Leo

jenper on March 13, 2009

A perfect setting Marilyn!! greetings, jenper

trikermike on March 13, 2009

Pretty good shooting!, wonder if they got lucky and got one through a window!

Mike

Marilyn Whiteley on March 13, 2009

Many thanks for your comments, Michael, Leo, jenper, and Mike.

The battle began on April 10, 1862, with the Union forces attacking the Confederate fort. The defenders had been confident because the brick walls were 7.5 ft. (almost 2.3m) thick, backed with additional masonry as you can see in this photo of the inside of the fort.

The Union forces, however, had a new weapon, the rifled gun, and its mortars could travel farther than traditional cannon balls. On the second day, the corner of the fort to the left of this view was breached, and shots landed perilously close to the magazine in which 40,000 pounds (more than 18,000kg) of powder was stored. The Confederates surrendered, and it was clear that even the strongest fortifications no longer offered protection.

Leo Roundtree on March 13, 2009

Marilyn,

Thank you for "the rest of the story" and the link. Very interesting and great photos.

Best wishes, Leo

Samantha Lacy ღ on March 14, 2009

Great shot Marilyn and thanks for the info all very interesting stuff!

Best wishes

Sam

trikermike on March 14, 2009

In short...boom boom, we give in!

superior forces have to win

open the gates and let them in,

, and we gotta take it on the chin!

Hank Waxman on March 14, 2009

Unfortunately, our respective histories are filled with stories of sieges; embattled fortresses and stories of great heroism. The markings on these walls are graphic reminders, and I thank you for bringing them to us.

My favorite comparison is the battle of Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor during the War of 1812. For those who may not know, the bombardment lasted over 25 hours, and the heroic Americans who "held on" through the siege are credited with saving the entire city of Baltimore.

My point is that the story of surviving against odds is the theme of the poem and song that commemorate the battle. So far from its present military bearing, our Star spangled Banner is truly a tribute to defensive heroism.

I try very hard to think of the words whenever I hear the song and imagine the joy, after 25 hours of bombardment how truly thrilling it must have been to see the flag surviving.

Sorry to use your photo as a soapbox, Marilyn, but your photo did make me think of the comparison.

Hank

Marilyn Whiteley on March 14, 2009

Thank you, Mike, for the poem, and, Hank, for the most appropriate soapbox oratory.

There's a bit of heroism in this story that I didn't specifically point out. Some might think that the "heroic" action would be to defend the fort to the bitter end. The young Confederate commander had the wisdom and the courage to surrender. He knew that sooner or later, a Union shot would reach that huge stash of gunpowder, and when it did, all the defenders would be killed in the blast. So he thought of his men instead of the "heroic" legacy they might leave.

Marilyn

skida on March 19, 2009

A wonderful, interesting shot Marilyn and I believe you did a lot of thinking about the composition.

Keith

Marilyn Whiteley on March 28, 2009

Thanks for your good comments, Bruce and Keith. The challenge was, of course, to maximize the assets of the scene and minimize the dullness of the day!

Marilyn

wiep keikes on November 10, 2009

Exelent Photo, Good work!!!

Regards Wiep Keikes / Holland

r.w. dawson on December 7, 2011

Nice find!

stevenvanValen+hanne… on April 13, 2013

nice picture!

Sign up to comment. Sign in if you already did it.

Photo taken in Fort Pulaski National Monument, US Highway 80 East, Savannah, GA 31410, USA

Photo details

  • Uploaded on March 13, 2009
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Marilyn Whiteley
    • Camera: OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP. SP550UZ
    • Taken on 2009/02/28 13:58:03
    • Exposure: 0.006s (1/160)
    • Focal Length: 12.24mm
    • F/Stop: f/4.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO50
    • Exposure Bias: -0.30 EV
    • No flash

Groups