Wellington Summer Panorama, a Twisted Visual Tale

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (1)

Peter Kurdulija on March 5, 2010

There are fisheye panoramas and to put them into existence you would need something like an ultra wide lens, called appropriately – fisheye lens. This is sophisticated and proportionally expensive piece of equipment and very much unlike my pocket 2MP camera, with its average optics, which I had the intention of using to get a similar effect. You may also need a tripod, another compulsory part of wide shot scenery making gear, that I never carry with me. Well, you could call it a ‘fishy’ panorama setup. Also, before I forget, you may require a big hill with an open view, and the means of getting to the summit of it.

I could see it all from there, like from the top of the world, as they like to say: the strong cloud shadows speedily crawling up and down the landscape, the blue waters of the Southern Pacific exploring the harbour and the habitually hyperactive Wellington wind only gently caressing vegetation on its way downhill, all the way to the sea.

You could observe people moving around, yes, you could see that too; a ferry taking them out, a plane getting them back in. And towards the north-east, this is funny, really … the Hutt Valley and Eastbourne and the XXL size storm clouds dismantling the beach party atmosphere in no time.

Click, click … click … it took a while with this focus response, or better call it focus confusion time, and shutter lag that puts you in danger of missing a faster than average glacier in action.

Despite it, feels great being on the top and looking down to it all, as you are almost able to absorb the place’s wholeness, like it somehow belongs to you, like you own it.

Then something came up and I had to return home, back to my place and my usual size.

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Peter Kurdulija
Lower Hutt, New Zealand

Photo details

  • Uploaded on March 5, 2010
  • Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works
    by Peter Kurdulija