Seals' Playground, Nugget Point, New Zealand

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (17)

bdeh on May 24, 2010

Great shot and place Ian. Greetings Berend

Deniz AKIN on May 24, 2010

Very nice photo ;)

Ian Stehbens on May 24, 2010

Thanks Deniz and Berend.

Have you tried counting the seals in this photo?

Perhaps I should arrange for a sponsor to provide an air ticket to NZ for the first person to get the census correct!!

Ian

bdeh on May 24, 2010

I think there are 7 seals Ian. Greetings Berend

Ian Stehbens on May 24, 2010

I am glad you have seen the first 7, Berend. There are at least 8 in and around the closest pool - the little dark square one left foreground.

sugarbag1 on May 24, 2010

An excellent shot Ian. Is this an arial shot?

Ian Stehbens on May 25, 2010

Hello David,

This was taken from the top of the cliff, near the base of the lighthouse (in the previous photos). Thanks for the lovely compliment.

Ian

Małgorzata Grzywacz on May 26, 2010

very lovely !!!!

it deserves a Bo toooooooo!!!

Małgorzata

Ian Stehbens on May 26, 2010

Dear Małgorzata,

I stood here on this vantage point enthralled by the plays of the many seals. There are more than 30 visible. In the 2 tiny pools on the rocks, the square pool and the long pool, the seals were flipping, rolling, and swimming repeated lengths. So any others were basking lazily like rock pillows at the base of the cliffs or in the open sunshine on the platforms. It truly was a seals' playground.

Warmest regards from Australia (and NZ!)

Ian

Nugget Point ... It's interesting... Why this cape has received such name? Severe landscape. If I didn't know that this place is in New Zealand would think that this image of one of places of coast of Cornwall. Probably here happen very strong a winds. It seems to me that somewhere here there should be a colony of sea-lions... though... probably I'm mistaken. Regards from Russia. Sergey.

Ian Stehbens on May 27, 2010

Dear Сергей,

Let's start with the sea lions. There are three different species of seals here, including the sea lions. And if you enlarge the image you will find around 40 of them in the small pools on the rocks, on the rocks and ledges, and at the base of the cliffs. In some cases the rocks look like seals, and in other cases the seals and sea lions look like rock pillows. But they are there! Enjoy doing a census.

And it is similar to Cornwall though this is a little more dramatic with more height than most of the Cornish coast, but the tilted geology is there on both coasts.

As for the place name, I understand it received its name from the many angular rocks that lie beyond the point. These nugget-like rocks pictured here are home to the fur seals and sea lions.

Welcome back to my gallery.

Warmest regards,

Ian

beegood on May 30, 2010

We could go to Cornwall too, not that far... have you seen it? These rocks look like precious pebbles thrown into eternity.... lovely dear friend. Saws all the animaly. A paradise, Ian. Thank you for sharing.

Love, Maja

Ian Stehbens on May 31, 2010

Yes, Maja, I have stood at Lands End. If you were to come to NZ, I could show you Cornwall, Switzerland, Denmark, Norway all in one outing! Though NZ coasts are a little more dramatic than they are in Cornwall, as lovely as they are.

Again I delight in your imagery, Maja: pebbles thrown into eternity. I was much more pedestrian seeing them as nuggets cast into the sea.

You are welcome to find a little piece of Paradise in NZ.

Ian

Hadi Karimi on June 2, 2010

very nice landscape........

Hadi ............ IRAN

Ian Stehbens on June 3, 2010

It is quite a spectacular coast, Hadi. I kept following it as much as I could. The inland areas will have to wait till my next visit.

Ian

►Berat Qevî Endam on June 8, 2010

nice photo of coast

Ian Stehbens on June 8, 2010

Thanks Barat. It is a most attractive coastline: bold, colourful and alive with wildlife.

Greetings from Australia.

Ian

Sign up to comment. Sign in if you already did it.

Photo details

  • Uploaded on May 24, 2010
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Ian Stehbens

Groups