Georgetown Loop Rail Road

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Comments (6)

Ryan Calhoun on September 5, 2007

Rich, this is a wonderful photo of a locomotive! Just the steam whistle and bell, with a beautiful background in the mountains. This whistle doesn't look very happy!

Richard Ryer on September 5, 2007

Greetings Ryan, Thanks for visiting the Georgetown Loop. Now that you mention it the whistle does have a distressed look to it. The mountains in the background have the tailing piles from the silver mines that dot the mountain side.

Cheers,

Rich

© Carsten on December 8, 2007

Hi Richard. I like this close up of the locomotive. The essential of it. I very much like the background and feeling of the technical time in the rough nature though the locomotive is old. Good work on the steam.

Greetings,

Carsten

Richard Ryer on December 8, 2007

Greetings Carsten, Thanks for visiting the Georgetown Loop Rail Road and commenting. As you can see in the background there are silver mines on the North Hillside. When you visit the cemetery above town you see a cross section of those who rest there and many are miners in amongst the many children. The train was an integral part of the economy, bringing down the ore and bringing tourists up. A rail road society maintains the trains and tracks under contract with the state historical society. The whole operation is fun to visit.

Cheers,

Rich

© Carsten on December 9, 2007

Hi Richard, thank you for your answer. We also have in Germany the old steam locomotives and they are also operated by societies. I always wanted to take a ride with these special driving events. Usually there are a lot train specialists who know every detail of the locomotive and the numbers and they are all running around with their cameras. In fact for them the trains are always making repeated station enterings. Do you have these fan clubs over there too ?

Greetings,

Carsten

Richard Ryer on December 9, 2007

Greetings Carsten, The Georgetown Loop society run the train during the spring, summer and fall, every day. Most of the week day operators are retired. The same holds true for the Durango Silverton and Cumbres Toltec rail roads. Most of the engines in use in Colorado were shipped in from Central and South America. Society people still spend a lot of effort learning every thing about the history of the engines they restore and run. It is quite a hobby. So the fan clubs keep these rail roads running on a limited amount of track and they tourists line up well in advance for a chance to ride the trains.

Cheers,

Rich

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on September 3, 2007
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Richard Ryer
    • Camera: Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
    • Taken on 2007/09/02 10:52:39
    • Exposure: 0.025s (1/40)
    • Focal Length: 73.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/14.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO100
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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