Night Panorama of Dover Castle above Beach, Seafront, and Harbour, Kent, UK

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (14)

John Latter on January 2, 2011

A view of the south-western face of Dover Castle's Keep, or Great Tower, at 6.43 pm on New Years Day, Saturday, 1st of January, 2011.

The Norman Keep is "83 feet (25.3m) high and just under 100 feet (30m) square, with walls up to 21 feet (6.5m) thick... (it was) designed by Henry II’s architect ‘Maurice the Engineer’ (or mason) and built between 1180 and 1185" (1).

Below the Keep are the uncrenellated (ie flat-topped) towers of the Inner Bailey wall, or Inner Curtain Wall. There are two entrances to the Keepyard: on the left of the inner curtain wall is a flanking tower of the King`s Gateway and those of the Palace Gateway are on the right.

Below the Inner Curtain Wall are the towers of the western Outer Curtain Wall, from left to right: Constable`s Gateway (the pedestrian entrance to the castle), Queen Mary Tower, Peverell Gateway, Gatton Tower, Say Tower (not illuminated), Hurst Tower, and the top part of the square-shaped Fulbert Tower.

The group on Harold's Earthwork near the top left-hand corner of the photo consist of the Roman ruins of the East Pharos (watchtower/lighthouse, built 46 AD) and Saxon church of St Mary-in-Castro (more Dover Churches).

Click to see all photos of the Grade I Listed Dover Castle, or other Listed Buildings and English Heritage locations in the town of Dover, England (nb the Pharos and St Mary-in-Castro are listed buildings in their own right).

On the Seafront in the lower-half of the photo the Gateway Flats overlook Marine Parade, the Beach and Harbour, to the Straits of Dover and English Channel beyond.

Above the Gateway Flats on the left-hand side are lights from Victoria Park (the Gate House).

The photo, best viewed in a larger size, was taken from the Clock Tower end of the Prince of Wales Pier.

(1) Extract from "History of Dover Castle": The Medieval Castle:

Dover Castle is above all a great medieval fortress, created by King Henry II and his Plantagenet successors. At its heart stands the mighty Keep or Great Tower, 83 feet (25.3m) high and just under 100 feet (30m) square, with walls up to 21 feet (6.5m) thick. The grandest and among the last of the keeps raised by the kings of England during the 11th and 12th centuries, it was designed by Henry II’s architect ‘Maurice the Engineer’ and built between 1180 and 1185. A symbol of kingly power and authority guarding the gateway to the realm, it was also a palace designed for royal ceremony, and to house Henry’s travelling court.

Within this magnificent showpiece, Henry could welcome and impress distinguished visitors to England - particularly noble pilgrims travelling to the new shrine in Canterbury Cathedral of St.Thomas Becket, slaughtered before the altar by Henry’s household knights only a dozen or so years before the Great Tower was begun.

John Latter / Jorolat

Dover Blog: The Psychology of a Small Town

This is the Images of Dover website: click on any red or blue "John Latter" link to access the Entry Page.

Bluescape on January 7, 2011

Now that's a really beautiful view! I love city lights

John Latter on January 8, 2011

Bluescape, on January 7th, 2011, said:

Now that's a really beautiful view! I love city lights

Thank you, Bluescape :)

I see this scene every evening when I go for a cycle ride along Dover Seafront. On this particulasr occasion, I took the photo because it wasn't too c-c-cold!

John Latter on October 6, 2011

Excerpt from "Port of Dover" (1):

The Port of Dover is the cross-channel port situated in Dover, south-east England. It is the nearest English port to France, at just 34 kilometres (21 miles) away, and one of Europe's largest passenger ports, with 14 million travellers, 2.1 million lorries, 2.8 million cars and motorcycles and 86,000 coaches passing through it each year, with an annual turnover of GBP 58.5 million a year.

The port has been owned and operated by the Dover Harbour Board, a statutory corporation, since it was formed by Royal Charter in 1606 by James I. Most of the board members are appointees of the Department of Transport.

The port has its own private police force, the Port of Dover Police.

The port claims to be the world's busiest passenger port.

Of historical interest: excerpt from the 1822, "Reports of cases argued and determined in the Court of King's Bench, during Hilary, Easter, and Trinity terms, in the second and third Geo. IV." (2):

DOVER HARBOUR: A post-office packet, under a contract to carry mails from Dover to Calais, entering the harbour of Dover, on her return voyage, bringing no mail of letters, but having on board dispatches for his Majesty's Secretary at War, and having also on board private passengers, a carriage, and bullion, for passage and freight; the vessel being the private property of the commander, is a vessel employed in his Majesty's service, and therefore exempt from the Dover harbour dues, payable under the 47 Geo. 3. c. 69. (Act of Parliament); the sixth section of which act contains an exemption in favour of vessels belonging to his Majesty, or that may be employed in his service. Hamilton v. Stone, 3 G. 4. Page 274.

(1) Wikipedia entry for Port of Dover

(2) "Reports of cases argued and determined in the Court of King's Bench, during Hilary, Easter, and Trinity terms, in the second and third Geo. IV." Great Britain. Court of King's Bench; by Sir James Dowling (1787-1844) and Archer Ryland (1792-1857), Barristers at Law. Volume I, published 1822 in the second and third years of the reign of King George IV.

Ruud Jakobs on April 11, 2012

Beautiful nightshot Like. And, a Favorit, for all the info, you are sharing ! Much appreciated.

Best regards, Ruud

John Latter on April 11, 2012

Thank you very much, Ruud - Greetings from Dover, England!

Spiros_PT on August 27, 2012

excellent night image - liked!

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on January 2, 2011
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by John Latter
    • Camera: PENTAX Corporation PENTAX K100D
    • Taken on 2011/01/01 18:43:33
    • Exposure: 30.000s
    • Focal Length: 55.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/20.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO200
    • Exposure Bias: 1.00 EV
    • No flash

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