After the corn is gone

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Comments (12)

Ryan Calhoun on September 19, 2007

This is a 180 degree panorama stitched from 13 images. As a raw file, it's 109 MB at 19943x1903. Uploaded, the "Original size" is a scaled down jpeg, 4 MB at 13959x1332, still large enough to count how many stalks of corn have been harvested from this field.

♫ Swissmay on September 19, 2007

Impressive photo, Ryan! I haven't counted the stalks yet, ;-) but, yes, it seems to be endless. In the distance is still some corn left. I didn't recognize it at first, because I was surprised how dry and yellow it is. Our corn still looks green. They don't earn the corn cobs, but the whole plant - which is now about 2 meters high - to feed the animals.

Greetings, May

Ryan Calhoun on September 19, 2007

Thanks, May! All our cornfields turn golden during September, like this one too. This was a pretty early harvest, from September 3rd. This field is dent corn, used for livestock feed, and also for the oil and starch. The sweet corn harvest is earlier, usually late July or August.

Around here, the corn gets as high as an elephant's eye.

Greetings, Ryan

♫ Swissmay on September 19, 2007

Our cereals turn golden as well, when they are ripe. Maybe I made a mistake, because I thought corn was just maize. But probably it's all kind of cereals?! The wheat here is harvested in August. Maize (corn) in about 2 weeks, I guess. Greetings, May

Ryan Calhoun on September 19, 2007

The crop which you call maize is the same as the one we call corn. The kind we eat is sweet corn (yellow or white), which can be eater on or off the cob. Cattle and sheep feed comes from silage, which is harvested very early while the plant is still green, mixed with wheat, and put in silos to ferment. Dent corn is left in the field until the whole plant is completely dry. Blue corn is another dry harvest, used to make many kind of meal and flour (very common in tortilla shells). This year I'm surprised there's any corn left to harvest, since it was hot enough this summer for the corn to pop right on the stalk.

Here's the best way to prepare sweet corn: Soak the whole ear in cold water to thoroughly wet the husk and the silk. Carefully peel back the husk and remove all the silk. Butter and season the kernels (I prefer crushed red pepper and ground black pepper). Close the husk back over the ear, and tie the end shut with wet string. Roast the whole ear over an open flame or on a barbecue grill until the husk is completely dry and dark brown. It will cook better with a lid or cover over the corn to help hold the steam in. The corn should go on 30-40 minutes after the potatoes (russet potatoes are the best) and they should get done at the same time.

Greetings, Ryan

♫ Swissmay on September 19, 2007

Ryan, thank you very much for the information and for the recipe! I'll have a try! :-)

Greetings, May

Dann Cianca on September 20, 2007

I want to print that out on a long piece of paper and wrap it around my head.

Dann.

Ryan Calhoun on September 20, 2007

Thanks, Dann! I have to admit I've done that very thing with a long series of (film) prints all taped together. It was a lot less work back then, since the seams only had to be close (unless you were going to start stretching the paper).

Ryan

Dann Cianca on September 20, 2007

Maybe there is such a thing as stretchy paper ... wouldn't that be cool?

dann.

Ryan Calhoun on September 20, 2007

Ah, stretchy paper! Maybe photos can be printed on silly putty.

Now I'm curious. Most of the distortion is caused by the curvature of the camera lens, and gets worse at the edges of the image. It's more severe with a wider lens as well. In the days of film, enlargements were done with a machine equivalent to a slide projector, but with negatives. I wonder if a 4-image panorama could be stitched with 4 side-by-side negative enlarging machines, where the projector lenses could be adjusted to account for the camera's distortion?

In theory, the optical quality of the final image should be unaffected, giving you a perfect panorama without any digital artifacts. Of course, by time you make a print, and consider all the time and money involved, it's better just to scan the negatives and use a software stitcher, I guess.

Sadly, a google search for "stretchy paper" turns up no relevant results...

Ryan

Dann Cianca on September 21, 2007

That's a good question Ryan, one which I'm unfortunately unqualified to answer. I'm still quite amateurish when it comes to taking pictures. I've just discovered my love of photography after the last two seasons of storm chasing. Now I want to photograph everything (esp. scenery, weather).

Maybe the stretchy paper could be your invention? Could be a lot of money in it ...

Dann.

Ryan Calhoun on September 21, 2007

Alright. I'll let you know how it goes!

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on September 19, 2007
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    by Ryan Calhoun

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