Bertie County Confederate Monument, Windsor, North Carolina

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J. Stephen Conn on May 23, 2011

The very interesting history of the Confederate Monument in Windsor, North Carolina, reprinted below, was originally published in the book: "Historic Southern Monuments; Representative Memorials of the Heroic Dead of the Southern Confederacy."

By Bettie Alder Calhoun Emerson Published by General Books LLC, Jan 4, 1910

WINDSOR, N. C.

A Confederate monument was unveiled, August 13, in Windsor, North Carolina. Windsor is an old Colonial town near the Atlantic coast, the capital of Bertie County, and its history antedates many years the Revolutionary War. Its public buildings were of brick from England.

It was once a wealthy and aristocratic place, but suffered much in the crucial test of reconstruction and the severe ordeal that followed it. It has recuperated, however, wonderfully, aided by its large and valuable fisheries on the Roanoke River and Albemarle Sound. It is not only historic, but enthusiastically Confederate. It furnished many more soldiers for the Confederate army than it had voters. It was in Bertie County that the celebrated "Captain Byrd's Company" was raised and equipped for the war. That company—of the 1 1th North Carolina Infantry—participated in Pickett's charge at Gettysburg, with thirty-eight men besides its captain (Byrd) and two lieutenants. Thirty-four of them were killed or wounded. Captain Byrd and the four men left for service went into the fight next day, when he and two of the four men were killed.

It was the color company of the regiment, and the flag waved on although its staff was twice shot away. The flag was preserved through and survived the battle. After a time, such of the wounded as were able returned to the company and preserved its organization. Its first-lieutenant, Ed Outlaw, who on that fatal day was under detail by order of General Lee, became its captain, and, with some additions to the company, commanded it in subsequent battles and on until the surrender of Appomattox. Two of the survivors of that charge were on the speaker's stand while General W. B. Bate, of Tennessee, delivered the address at the unveiling of the monument.

Four thousand people were present to witness the ceremonies. A royal welcome was given General Bate, winding up with a public reception at night in his honor. Bertie County was the home of the paternal ancestors of General Bate for several generations, and that added much to the interest of the occasion.

On the front of the monument is this inscription:

WE RESPONDED TO OUR COUNTRY'S CALL. -- WE FOUGHT AN HONEST FIGHT, WE KEPT THE SOUTHRON'S FAITH. WE FELL AT THE POST OF DUTY. WE DIED FOR THE LAND WE LOVED. -- ERECTED BY THE CONFEDERATE VETERANS ASSOCIATION OF BERTIE, 1896 -- OUR CONFEDERATE DEAD 1861-1865

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    by J. Stephen Conn

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