Cemetery(Graveyard) of the Uhud Martyrs Hamza Ibn Abdul Muttalib قبر سيد الشهداء حمزة إبن عبد المطلب

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (1)

A Aqeel on February 8, 2012

The above enclosure, at the foot of Mount Uhud contains in the centre the graves of Hamza (r.a.), Abdullah bin Jasht (r.a.) and Mus’ab bin Umair (r.a.) who were all martyred in the Battle of Uhud. The rest of the martyrs of Uhud are buried behind this enclosure.

Hamza ibn Abdul Muttalib was one of the finest huntsmen and greatest warrior of the Arabs. In the battle of Badr, he had killed many of the Qurayshi nobles and now he cut his way through their ranks like a mighty wave sweeping all before it. One of the Qurayshi nobles had a black slave called Wahshi from Abyssinia (present Ethiopia) who could use the javelin with great skill. Hind, the wife of Abu Sufyan, promised Wahshi freedom and his master Jubayr bin Mut’im also promised him the same as Hamza (r.a.) had killed his uncle in Badr. Wahshi prowled amongst the fighters until he saw Hamza (r.a.). He says, “I held my spear and balanced it well, then I aimed it. It entered into his abdomen and went out the other side. I waited until he was dead, then I took my spear and went to wait in the camp. I had no quarrel with anyone. I killed him only to be set free.” Wahshi later on in life became a Muslim and killed Musailimah, the imposter who claimed Prophethood after the demise of the Prophet Muhammad (s.a.w.).

When the tide of war turned towards the Quraysh, the women of Quraysh, led by Hind, whose brother, uncle and loved ones had been killed in Badr began to mutilate the Muslim dead. She particularly vented her fury on the body of Hamza (r.a.), cutting off his nose and ears, making a slit in his chest, taking out his liver, chewing it but unable to swallow it. The Prophet (s.a.w.) was greatly grieved when he came upon the body of his beloved uncle. Years later, when Makkah lay open at his feet, he gave all its inhabitants, including Hind a free pardon. Hind subsequently accepted Islam.

Mus’ab (r.a.) held the flag of Islam. When the Muslims on meeting defeat were dispersing in confusion, he held the flag and stood at his post like a rock. An enemy came and cut his hand with a sword, so that the flag might fall and the defeat might be accomplished. He at once took the flag in the other hand. The enemy then cut the other hand also. He held the flag to his bosom with the help of his bleeding arms. The enemy at last pierced his body with an arrow. He fell dead and, with him fell the flag that he had not allowed to fall while he was alive. Another Muslim ran and took over the flag. At the time of his burial, he had only one sheet to cover his body. This sheet was too short for his size. When it was drawn to cover the head, the feet would be exposed, and when it was drawn to cover the feet, the head would become uncovered. The Prophet (s.a.w.) said:

“Cover his head with the sheet, and his feet with the ‘Azkhar’ leaves.”

Around sixty-five Ansar and four Muhajirun were honoured with martyrdom while there were twenty-two fatalities among the polytheists.

The Jews kept waiting the outcome of the battle in their safe dwellings. Mukhairiq, a person amongst the Jews told his people that they must lend support to Prophet Muhammad. “We can’t fight for this is Saturday,” they replied. He said, “This is the fighting between the Prophet and the disbelievers, so Saturday can’t stand in the way.” He took his sword and pronounced that in case he was killed, all of his property should be given to Muhammad (s.a.w.) and non should go against him. He joined the battle and was killed. When the Prophet (s.a.w.) came to know of this, he remarked, “He was the best of the Jews.”

The Prophet (s.a.w.) instructed the martyrs to be buried still covered with blood, in the condition that they had fallen. Two or three of the martyrs were buried in a single grave. In some cases, he directed his Companions to shroud the martyrs in pairs. The martyr who had learned more of the Qur’an was lowered in the grave first. Paying tribute to their sacrifice in the cause of Allah, the Prophet (s.a.w.) said, “I shall be a witness unto them on the Day of Resurrection.”

As they retrieved the bodies of their martyred brothers, the people came upon the body of Hanzlah bin Abu Amer (r.a.) above the earth with water dripping from it. The Prophet (s.a.w.) explained to his men, “The angels are bathing him.” Apparently, the newly married Hanzlah had just consummated his marriage when the call for Jihad was made. Without even stopping to bathe, he left his bride and rushed into the battlefield. Hanzlah fought heroically and was martyred, so the Prophet (s.a.w.) explained that the angels were bathing him to purify his body. Hanzlah was forever remembered as “Ghaseel Al-Malaaika” (one bathed by the angels).

The Prophet (s.a.w.) used to visit the graves of the martyrs of Uhud and thus it is sunnah to also visit them. However, care should be taken not to engage in any innovative or non-Muslim practices such as supplicating to the martyrs, throwing letters or money into the graveyard, the tying of threads or tawaf.

References: History of Madinah Munawwarah – Dr. Muhammad Ilyas Abdul Ghani Fazail-e-Aamal – Sheikh Muhammad Zakariyya Kandhalvi The History of Islam – Akbar Shah Najeebabadi The life of Muhammad – Tahia Al-Ismail

The Beloved Holy Prophet Muhammad Sallallāhu ‘alayhi wa Sallam put on his coat of arms and went for the Battle of Uhud in 3 A.H, 625 C.E with about 700 of his noble Sahāba (Companions) Rady Allāhu ‘Anhum against about 3000 better armed non-believers. In this battle, the Muslims received a set-back and about 70 Sahāba Rady Allāhu ‘Anhum were martyred. Even so, after this battle, Islām spread more and more, and far and wide. This shows that whether Muslims win a battle or receive a set-back, Islām always spreads as it is a universal religion for the whole of humanity till the end of time.

These then are the names of the Muslim martyrs of the Battle of Uhud in alphabetical order following the Arabic alphabet. Some of the letters do not occur because none of the martyrs had names beginning with those letters.

May Allāh Subhānahū wa Ta‘ālā make us walk in the footsteps of the Sahāba, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhum, Āmīn Yā Rabb al-‘Ālamīn.

Please recite “Sayyidinā” before each name and “Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu” (Allāh is pleased with him) after each name. Alif

  1. Anas bin an-Nadr al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  2. Unays bin Qatādah bin Rabī‘ah al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  3. Aws bin al-Arqam al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  4. Aws bin Thābit bin al-Mundhir al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  5. Iyās bin Aws al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Thā’

  6. Thābit bin ‘Amr bin Zayd al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  7. Thābit bin Waqsh al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  8. Tha‘labah bin Sa‘d al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  9. Thaqf bin Farwah al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Hā’

  10. al-Hārith bin Anas bin Rāfi‘ al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  11. al-Hārith bin Aws bin Mu‘ādh al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  12. al-Hārith bin‘Adī bin Kharashah al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  13. al-Hārith bin ‘Uqbah bin Qābūs al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  14. Hubāb bin Qayzī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  15. Habīb bin Zayd bin Tamīm al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  16. Husayl bin Jābir al-Awsī, Abū Hudhayfa al-Yamān, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  17. Asadullāh wa Asadu Rasūlihī, Sayyidush Shuhadā’ Hamza bin ‘Abdul Muttalib al-Badrī al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  18. Hanzala bin Abī ‘Āmir al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Khā’ (wa) Dhāl

  19. Khārijah bin Zayd bin Abī Zuhayr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  20. Khidāsh bin Qatādah al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  21. Khallād bin ‘Amr bin al-Jamūh al-Badrī, al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  22. Khaythama bin al-Hārith al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  23. Dhakwān bin ‘Abdi Qays al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Rā’ (wa) Zāy

  24. Rāfi‘ mawlā Ghaziyya bin ‘Amr al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  25. Rāfi‘ bin Mālik al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  26. Rifā‘ah bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  27. Rifā‘ah bin Waqsh al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  28. Zayd bin Wadī‘ah al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Sīn

  29. Subay‘ bin Hātib al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  30. Sa‘d al-Badrī, mawlā Hātib bin Abī Balta‘ah al-Badrī al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  31. Sa‘d bin ar-Rabī‘ bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  32. Sa‘īd bin Suwayd al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  33. Salamah bin Thābit bin Waqsh al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  34. Sulaym bin al-Hārith al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  35. Sulaym bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  36. Sahl bin Rūmī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  37. Sahl bin ‘Adī bin Zayd al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  38. Sahl bin Qays bin Abī Ka‘b al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Shīn (wa) Sād (wa) Dād

  39. Shammās bin ‘Uthmān al-Badrī al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  40. Sayfī bin Qayzī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  41. Damrah bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu ‘Ayn

  42. ‘Āmir bin Umayya al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  43. ‘Āmir bin Mukhallad al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  44. ‘Āmir bin Yazīd bin as-Sakan al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  45. ‘Abbād bin Sahl al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  46. ‘Ubbād bin al-Khashkhāsh al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  47. ‘Abbās bin ‘Ubāda al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  48. ‘AbdAllāh bin Jubayr al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  49. ‘AbdAllāh bin Jahsh al-Badrī al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  50. ‘AbdAllāh bin Salamah al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  51. ‘AbdAllāh bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  52. ‘AbdAllāh bin ‘Amr bin Wahb al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  53. ‘Ubayd bin at-Tayyihān al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  54. ‘Ubayd bin al-Mu‘allā al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  55. ‘Utbah bin Rabī‘ bin Rāfi‘ al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  56. ‘Aqrabah al-Juhanī, Abū Bashīr al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  57. ‘Umārah bin Ziyād bin as-Sakan al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  58. ‘Amr bin Thābit bin Waqsh al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  59. ‘Amr bin al-Jamūh al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  60. ‘Amr bin Qays bin Zayd al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  61. ‘Amr bin Mutarrif al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  62. ‘Amr bin Mu‘ādh al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  63. ‘Antarah as-Sulamī al-Badrī, mawlā Sulaym bin ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Qāf (wa) Kāf

  64. Qurrah bin ‘Uqba al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  65. Qays bin ‘Amr bin Zayd al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  66. Qays bin Mukhallad al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  67. Kaysān, mawlā Banī ‘Adī bin an-Najjār al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Mīm

  68. Mālik bin Iyās al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  69. Mālik bin Khalaf al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  70. Mālik bin Sinān al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  71. Mālik bin Numaylah al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  72. al-Mujadhdhar bin Ziyād al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  73. Mus‘ab bin ‘Umayr al-Badrī al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Nūn (wa) Wāw (wa) Yā’

  74. Nu‘mān bin Khalaf al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  75. Nu‘mān bin ‘Abdi ‘Amr al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  76. Nu‘mān bin Mālik al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  77. Nawfal bin ‘Abdillāh al-Badrī al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  78. Wahb bin Qābūs al-Muhājirī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  79. Yazīd bin Hātib al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  80. Yazīd bin as-Sakan al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  81. Yasār mawlā Abi’l Haytham bin at-Tayyihān al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu Al-Kunā

  82. Abū Ayman, mawlā ‘Amr bin al-Jamūh al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

  83. Abū Habbah bin ‘Amr bin Thābit al-Badrī al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  84. Abū Sufyān bin al-Hārith al-Awsī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu
  85. Abū Hubayrah bin al-Hārith al-Khazrajī, Rady Allāhu ‘Anhu

Wallāhu a‘lam (Allāh knows best). Al-Fātiha! References

‘Izzuddīn ibn Athīr Abi’l Hasan ‘Alī bin Muhammad al-Jazarī (555-630 A.H), Usdu’l Ghābah Fī Ma‘rifati’s Sahābah (Learning About The Companions, Lions in a Forest), Dār u’l Kutub al-‘Ilmiyya, Beirut, 1415/1994.

He gives the biographies of about 6700 sahāba and about 1000 sahābiyāt, that is the male and female Companions of Prophet Muhammad, Sallallāhu ‘alayhi wa Sallam, in alphabetical order. He indicates the sources, and gives details about the slight variations in reporting the full names of some of the Companions in the different sources. A study of this reveals that about half of the Muslim martyrs of the Battle of Uhud (3 A.H, 625 C.E) were al-Badrī as well, that is, those who had earlier participated in the Battle of Badr in 2 A.H, 624 C.E against non-believers.
As-Sayyid Imām Ja‘far bin Hasan bin ‘Abdul Karīm al-Barzanjī (1690-1766 C.E), Asmā’ Shuhadā’ Uhud Rady Allāhu ‘Anhum (The Names of the Martyrs of Uhud), in Mukhkhul ‘Ibāda (The Kernel of Worship), compiled by al-Habīb as-Sayyid ‘AbdAllāh bin Mustafā bin Hasan al-Aydarūs, n.d, p. 493-496.

This is a Tawassul Shuhadā’ Uhud, that is, a supplication to Allāh through the means of the martyrs of Uhud. It is a rāiyya, a poem all of whose 30 verses end and rhyme in the letter rā. It contains only the first names of the Companions.
Shaykh Mustafā Rushdī bin Ismā‘īl ad-Dimashqī, Asmā’ Shuhadā’ Uhud Rady Allāhu ‘Anhum (The Names of the Martyrs of Uhud), in Jabr u’l Kasr (Mending The Broken), Maktaba Ishā‘ah al-Islām, Delhi, n.d, p.23-24.

This is a Tawassul Shuhadā’ Uhud. It is a rāiyya, a poem all of whose 24 verses end and rhyme in the letter rā’. It contains only the first names of the Companions in alphabetical order but indicates as well whether they are the Muhājirīn, that is the Emigrants from Makka, or the Ansār, that is, the Helpers from Madīna, and among the Ansār, whether they belong to or allied with the two major tribes of Aws, hence called Awsī, or Khazraj, hence called Khazrajī. He composed the Tawassul in 1308 A.H.
Shaykh ‘AbdurRahmān Chohravi, Majmū‘a Salāwāt i’r Rasūl (A Compendium of Blessings on Prophet Muhammad, may the peace and blessings of Allāh be upon him), Anjuman Rahmāniyya, Chittagong, Bangladesh, 1982. Shaykh ‘Abdur Rahmān Chohravi passed away in 1342 A.H.

Part of Juz 30, p. 24-25 contain the salawāt woven together with the names of the martyrs of the Battle of Uhud in alphabetical order.
Al-Hājj Muhammad bin Nāsir bin ‘AbdAllāh al-Qādirī ash-Shāfi‘ī, Hidāya lis-Sālik wa Najāh li’l Hālik fi’t Tawassul bi Ahli Badr wa Shuhadā’ Uhud (Guidance For Spiritual Travellers and Salvation For The Doomed), Jumu‘iyya Zāwiyatul Qādiriyya, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1385/1965, p. 40-46.

This is a Tawassul Ahl Badr as well as Shuhadā’ Uhud in prose. It gives the first names of the Companions in alphabetical order, indicating whether they are the Muhājirīn or the Ansār, and among the Ansār, whether they belong to or are allied with the tribe of Aws or Khazraj.

It is generally agreed among Muslim historian that seventy Muslims were martyred in the Battle of Uhud. Even so, Imām al-Barzanjī has the names of 103 Companions whom he considers to have been martyred, Shaykh Mustafā Rushdī ad-Dimashqī and al-Hājj Muhammad bin Nāsir al-Qādirī ash-Shāfi‘ī have 101 and Shaykh ‘Abdur Rahmān Chohravi has 86. One reason why the list is greater than 70 is that in some instances, Muslim historians and the ‘ulamā (the learned) are not absolutely sure from the evidence they have collected whether a particular Companion was actually martyred at Uhud or not. So, perhaps they have decided to err in including the name rather to err in leaving it out.

Wallāhu a‘lam (Allāh knows best).

Sign up to comment. Sign in if you already did it.

Photo taken in Uhud Battle Field, Sayed As Shuhada, Medina 42321, Saudi Arabia
Uhud Battle Field

Photo details

  • Uploaded on February 8, 2012
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by A Aqeel
    • Camera: Apple iPhone 4
    • Taken on 2011/11/26 09:19:25
    • Exposure: 0.001s (1/1676)
    • Focal Length: 3.85mm
    • F/Stop: f/2.800
    • ISO Speed: ISO80
    • No flash

Groups