Mt Tibrogargan, Glass House Mountains: South West ascent track.

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Comments (10)

Cris Brazzelli on March 7, 2012

The polished track can be seen from the moon

Ian Stehbens on March 7, 2012

..but not on GE.

Fritz77 on March 7, 2012

The track certainly looks a lot bigger from the air. Great shot!

Ian Stehbens on March 7, 2012

I am really glad you are enjoying these photos of SE Queensland, Fritz. Thanks for your encouragement.

Ian

pedrocut on March 18, 2012

Hi Ian

A flying squirrel; an amazing piece of geology!

All the best from England, Peter

Ian Stehbens on March 18, 2012

Greetings Peter. One of the volcanic plugs, your countryman, James Cook, though looked like the bottle kilns of Starffycher (Staffordshire) and so called them the Glasshouse Mountains as he sailed by in 1770.

I am intending to climb the east face with the guidance of Yoorala and we will then descend this back track... come some fine cool weather.

Regards,

Ian

pedrocut on March 19, 2012

Hi Ian

I will look forward to the pictures.

Methinks that I may be able to get up there, but the knees would not get me back down!

Best wishes Peter

Fritz77 on March 19, 2012

Hi Ian, enjoy the climb! Fritz

Cris Brazzelli on March 20, 2012

Often the descent of the tourist track can be very dangerous due the large amount of rocks trundled above you by tourists. Rapping off the eastern face is quick, safer and far more spectacular.

Ian Stehbens on March 21, 2012

Now there you are, Peter. Yoorala has solved your problem - use the ropes to get down!

I am looking forward to it, though when I think about one piece of the climb near the summit, I admit to there being some nervousness. I am sure I can do it with Yoorala's experience and care.

I am not sure I need to take a camera on the climb, for the aerials will satisfy me.

Thanks for the encouragement, Fritz and Peter.

Ian

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on March 6, 2012
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Ian Stehbens

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