Trier - Porta nigra

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Comments (8)

Marilyn Whiteley on January 24, 2008

Excellent: fine composition and perfect timing.

Erik Eshuis on January 24, 2008

Thank you, Marilyn! I think I waited till these people were under the arch and had become silhouettes, but I'm not sure anymore. Actually most of my pictures are taken with a mix of instinct and conscious level and I cannot always analyse why I did this or that. How is it with you? Are you always aware of every aspect of a photographic situation?

Greetings, Erik

Marilyn Whiteley on January 24, 2008

Certainly for me there's a mix of much instinct and some consciousness. That's something I find stimulating about Panoramio: I like to look at other people's photos and also at my own to try to figure out what makes some of them work well and others miss the mark to a smaller or larger degree. (Of course I try not to post my own failures, but I'm not sure I always recognize what didn't work!) However you did this one, you certainly got it right!

Greetings, Marilyn

Erik Eshuis on January 24, 2008

Thank you Marilyn, but I'm not always sure if I did something instinctively at the right moment, (I don't consider myself such a big talent), but I also recognize like you what worked or not and if I released the trigger at 'the right moment'.

You must be familiar I assume with the work of Henri Cartier-Bresson and his theory of 'the decisive moment'?! The moment when the constellation of all visible things reaches a certain maximum in significance and relationship, which could only be captured by the one who has 'the eye' (Cartier-Bresson). Do you believe in this theory? I myself find it difficult to believe in, for I cannot see this moment and oversee so much things together at once, but I can see the genius of his pictures, and must admit that some see more than others.

This decisive moment theory merely counts for 'documentary' photography, with moving objects and persons as a subject, and of course much less for static photography, like e.g. architecture.

Greetings, Erik

Marilyn Whiteley on January 24, 2008

Interesting thoughts, Erik. As you say, the "decisive moment" seems most applicable to photojournalism, and C-B was an expert at capturing it. Can it be expanded to photography in which the "moment" has to do more with composition and not emotion or split-second action? This shot of yours caught the foreground family in exactly the right place for an excellent composition. I guess that's part of why I find it so impressive.

It's inevitable that there are lots of "near misses" or even "not-so-near misses" along the way, when the instincts were right but the constellation was not at its maximum. On a YouTube item, C-B says, "You have to milk the cow quit a lot and get plenty milk to make a little cheese." That should be consolation for all of us!

Greetings, Marilyn

Erik Eshuis on January 27, 2008

Well spoken! To achieve excellent or good results you have to work very hard. Talent certainly is necessary, but not the only thing!

Greetings, Erik

Majlend Bramo on March 9, 2008

The creativity takes a great part on a picture, like in this one,

Well done Erik, cheers!

Erik Eshuis on March 11, 2008

Thanks, Majlend! I don't want to be too modest but there was much instinct on this one for I cannot remember the moment I pushed the trigger and what I saw actually...but the timing was exactly right indeed.

Cheers, Erik!

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on January 7, 2008
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Erik Eshuis
    • Camera: Canon DIGITAL IXUS 500
    • Taken on 2006/04/12 17:17:38
    • Exposure: 0.002s (1/640)
    • Focal Length: 22.22mm
    • F/Stop: f/4.900
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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