Australia, Anunga

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Comments (21)

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Jason39 on February 18, 2007

what does anunga mean

rosina lamberti on February 20, 2007

The rock is sacred to the local Anunga Aborigines.

Ayers Rock is the popular English designation (named after Sir Henry Ayers, a 19th century Australian governor). However, the rock's official appellation is Uluru, the one given by the Anunga Aborigines.

Jason39 on February 21, 2007

The rock is sacred to the local Anunga Aborigines.

Ayers Rock is the popular English designation (named after Sir Henry Ayers, a 19th century Australian governor). However, the rock's official appellation is Uluru, the one given by the Anunga Aborigines

jacqie on March 28, 2007

Grand

Joaquín Ramirez on May 10, 2007

Hi,Rosina Lamberti : I like it for the visual impact that it causes to the first sight. I am charmed with your work. You are one of my favorites. A greeting from Spain.

rosina lamberti on May 12, 2007

Thank u Joaquin its truly an amazing place to visit, The rock is sacred to the local Anunga Aborigines :):)

Arturo García on May 14, 2007

Why so low definition for a so beautiful photo? Do you believe that the title was necessary? Excuse me if I only make questions.

rosina lamberti on May 17, 2007

l will try to upload larger version, it was one one my final pieces for uni course so addition of font was one of the critea that had to be met. cheers:)

Arturo García on May 17, 2007

I wait with true anxiety for the new version, because the landscape is delicious and the photo is wonderful, like everything what leaves your hands. Greetings from Granada, Arturo.

rosina lamberti on May 17, 2007

Arturo García said:

I wait with true anxiety for the new version, because the landscape is delicious and the photo is wonderful, like everything what leaves your hands. Greetings from Granada, Arturo.

Will search for larger version, thanks Arturo :)

rosina lamberti on May 18, 2007

over 500 million years old,

Creating the fans

550 million years ago the Peterman Ranges to the west of Kata Tjuta were taller than they are now. Rainwater flowing down the mountains eroded sand and rock and dropped it in big fan shapes on the surrounding plain.

One fan had mainly water-smoothed rocks. The other fan was mainly sand. Both fans became kilometres thick.

Folding and tilting

About 400 million years ago, the sea had disappeared and the whole of Central Australia began to be subjected to massive forces. Some rocks folded and tilted. The rocky fan tilted slightly. The sand fan tilted 90 degrees so the layers of sandstone almost stood on end.

Wearing away

Over the last 300 million years, the softer rocks have eroded away, leaving the parts of the old fans exposed. Kata Tjuta is a hard part of the old rocky fan. Uluru is part of the sand fan, with its beds of sandstone nearly vertical.

Arturo García on May 18, 2007

Are you Geologist, Rosina?

rosina lamberti on May 18, 2007

hi Arturo, no l'm not geologist, just a quote from Uluru website about age of rock. Just a Passionate Photographer:)

rosina lamberti on May 24, 2007

Larger version of Uluru without title

Cheers Rosina

Svein Westerheim on December 7, 2007

Always had,and have,a dream to visit Ayers Rock or Anunga as the right name is. Looks fantastic!

souwar on December 16, 2007

helweh

Anam Cara (PN) on December 27, 2007

Great picture the contrasts are superb

josep.cat on March 7, 2008

Realment meravellosa¡¡¡¡ Felicitats-Congratulations from Catalonia. Josep Àngel

LAURA PENTASSUGLIA on June 7, 2008

Ciao Rosina, le tue foto sono tutte bellissime, e in particolare quelle dell'australia a me molto cara.

Valerio Giulianelli on August 5, 2010

great photo, I like

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on February 5, 2007
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by rosina lamberti
    • Camera: KONICA MINOLTA DYNAX 7D
    • Taken on 2006/09/26 18:57:17
    • Exposure: 0.008s (1/125)
    • Focal Length: 50.00mm
    • F/Stop: f/5.600
    • ISO Speed: ISO200
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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