Stehbens Reach, Yabba Creek flows beneath Mount Grainger, Imbil, Queensland

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

Comments (14)

Palmina Moore on January 31, 2008

What beautiful scenery. It looks wonderful!

Palmina

Ian Stehbens on January 31, 2008

Dear Palmina,

Here is another piece of the new world for you to explore. For me it's my 'sense of home'. Whenever I go home to visit my mother, I am sure that there will be another photo or two for my panoramio friends.

This picture may help you understand my enjoyment of your mountain forest drives in Victoria. This village of mine was and is a significant sawmilling community, with 20 000 Ha of plantation softwoods in the forestry. That's partly why I can write to you about epicormic growth and the impact of fire in our native forests.

I am delighted that you enjoy the beauty of Imbil.

Ian

Rafal Ociepka on January 31, 2008

Great view! I like this cow hidden in the shadow of a tree in LD corner :-)

Ian Stehbens on January 31, 2008

Rafal, It's is nice to have you receiving my images and responding like a mate. ("Mate" is an Aussie way of saying 'faithful friend'.)

I have just enlarged the pic to full size to see the cow in the shade, and in doing so realized that it is a very pleasing vista.

The gum trees on the left background are on our land, and the deep water in the creek upstream is that which we see from the windows of my mother's house (our family home).

Then as I look across this image, many stories of my experiences come back to mind. And the history of different uses of each part of the landscape, and the people who worked there or made the changes are remembered.

You have some special places too.

King regards,

Ian

Rafal Ociepka on February 1, 2008

You come from beautiful land. I have a great wish to visit Australia someday...

Ian Stehbens on February 2, 2008

Hi again, Rafal.

Once when I was teaching in Britain I had a slide of this place, with the dark green Black Bean trees beside the river and lighter green camphor laurel trees behind them and the blue mountain in the background. On a few memorable occasions, having used this as a backdrop to my story telling about wildlife (platypus, black swans, kingfishers and kookaburras etc) to the children in the school, I had an occasional teacher rebuke me afterwards for using pictures of Europe instead of pictures of Australia. They believed there was "no real grass in Australia, that our trees did not give shade, and that Australia was brown and desertlike"!! When I assured them that this was the creek I played in as a child, they were disbelievers!

I am glad therefore, to have introduced you to our beautiful land, as you have introduced me to the beautiful mountain areas of south Poland.

Ian

Marilyn Whiteley on February 2, 2008

Once more thank you for sharing both image and story--including that of the disbelieving British teachers! You had then and still have a roll to play challenging assumptions and stretching horizons. Marilyn

Ian Stehbens on February 2, 2008

Thanks Marilyn,

It was their beliefs about the 'first people' of Australia that astounded (angered) me more than the watered down Darwinian perceptions of our plants, animals and physical world. I am sure you can imagine.

I remember a letter from a Catholic School Principal that requested my presentation to "attend to kangaroos, koalas, rabbits and aborigines"! That was only 30 years ago ....

Our new Federal Government is preparing to say "sorry" to indigenous citizens for past, including recent abuses of them, their society and culture. I am pleased that I have lived through a period of transformation in national social attitudes and policies. Apology, forgiveness, and reconciliation are high on our national agenda: redress, more legal change, appropriate consultation and policy development will flow. I believe there is a general commitment in both the dominant and the indigenous society to offer and receive genuine acts of reconciliation.

Your particular skills and general field of interest could be applied in our context.

Ian

Marilyn Whiteley on February 2, 2008

I hadn't mentioned, Ian, that I'm embarking on a new phase of a project that I'd put on hold. I'd done some research and writing on a woman who at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th was a missionary to the Kiowa Indians in Oklahoma. The archives which holds her fifty years of journals is in the process of moving, and I'd thought there was nothing more I could do until they have relocated in Atlanta. But I a week and a half ago I realized that I both can and want to do something now. Very early in her missionary career she came to recognize the great injustices that had been and were being done to the Kiowas, and she became an outspoken supporter of Native rights. (I've already made extensive research notes using her journals from that period.) Of course in some ways she remained the "agent of colonialism" which is assumed to be the general stance of missionaries, but in some ways she was very different. So I am learning Kiowa history--a very sobering story--and hope to have a paper proposal formulated by the end of March to be considered for presentation at an independent scholars' conference in the fall. I'm not sure where this is heading, but I'm stimulated at the prospect.

All of which is to say, Ian, that the sad history is all too widespread, though there is now some light.

Marilyn

Ian Stehbens on February 4, 2008

Dear Marilyn,

I am sure you have plenty of motivation for the project but if I can offer any encouragement, please consider this my urging to research and write the paper. And remember when you have finished you have an attentive audience here waiting to read it.

Grace and peace,

Ian

©IR Stehbens on September 22, 2008

"I'm embarking on a new phase of a project that I'd put on hold. I'd done some research and writing on a woman who at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th was a missionary to the Kiowa Indians in Oklahoma. The archives which holds her fifty years of journals is in the process of moving, and I'd thought there was nothing more I could do until they have relocated in Atlanta. But I a week and a half ago I realized that I both can and want to do something now."

Hi Marilyn, has this project been advanced any, or will the winter allow you more time with fewer long trips? We are all interested at Alan Walker College, too.

Marilyn Whiteley on September 23, 2008

Thank you for asking. I did some work back then, but after that things stalled as other activities intervened. However much will happen within the next month! I'm scheduled to present a paper at a meeting in California in late October. The archives housing the material I need are opening in Atlanta at the end of this week, so sometime later I'll start gathering new material. (I have the necessary material for the current paper.) I hope you'll check in gain and prod me along!

良君 on April 1, 2011

大漂亮了,就是水质……?

Ian Stehbens on April 3, 2011

Thank you 良君. I love this part of the world.

Ian

Sign up to comment. Sign in if you already did it.

Photo details

  • Uploaded on January 30, 2008
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Ian Stehbens

Groups