Hellenic National holiday of "OXI!" (NO!) (by petinaki)

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THE PRIDE OF OXI DAY October 28th By Gary Van Haas The magnificent Greek holiday Oxi Day is celebrated every year in Greece on October 28th and mostly remembered for general Ioannis Metaxas' strong reply of 'oxi' (no) to Mussolini's request to allow Italian troops to come into Greece at the beginning of WW II. The result of this stern message was powerful, and in the end, helped to maintain Greece’s course of neutrality for generations to come. Nevertheless, the Italians did invade Greece, but were subsequently driven back into Albania. The story begins in 1935, when King George II was restored to the Greek throne by a rigged plebiscite, where he made the right-wing general Ioannis Metaxas prime minister. Nine months later, Metaxas assumed dictatorial powers with the king’s consent under the pretext of preventing a communist-inspired republican coup. The October 28 national holiday also marks the date in 1940 when Greece entered WWII. On that cherished day in Greek history, prime minister Ioannis Metaxas not only rejected Italy's ultimatum, he chose the road of resistance, and thus saved his reputation as a dictator. Cypriot countrymen also drew inspiration from Greece's refusal to let Italian troops invade in 1940 in the face of continued Turkish agression. For that matter, parades are also staged by Greek communities around the world in celebration of Oxi Day. Today in Greece, celebrations of Oxi Day culminate in a large, lavish military parade down the main boulevards of Athens and Thessoloniki. Soldiers, tanks, armoured vehicles and students parade through most Greek cities with an air of pride, and politicans in reviewing stands have an opportunity to show their own spirit to Greece and the resistance and how in future generations it should be continued. For tourists and foreigners, it's a proud spectacle to behold, so if you're ever in Greece during that time, be sure and see it!

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Comments (15)

petinaki on October 28, 2012

THE PRIDE OF OXI DAY October 28th

By Gary Van Haas.

The magnificent Greek holiday Oxi Day is celebrated every year in Greece on October 28th and mostly remembered for general Ioannis Metaxas' strong reply of 'oxi' (no) to Mussolini's request to allow Italian troops to come into Greece at the beginning of WW II. The result of this stern message was powerful, and in the end, helped to maintain Greece’s course of neutrality for generations to come. Nevertheless, the Italians did invade Greece, but were subsequently driven back into Albania. The story begins in 1935, when King George II was restored to the Greek throne by a rigged plebiscite, where he made the right-wing general Ioannis Metaxas prime minister. Nine months later, Metaxas assumed dictatorial powers with the king’s consent under the pretext of preventing a communist-inspired republican coup. The October 28 national holiday also marks the date in 1940 when Greece entered WWII. On that cherished day in Greek history, prime minister Ioannis Metaxas not only rejected Italy's ultimatum, he chose the road of resistance, and thus saved his reputation as a dictator. Cypriot countrymen also drew inspiration from Greece's refusal to let Italian troops invade in 1940 in the face of continued Turkish agression. For that matter, parades are also staged by Greek communities around the world in celebration of Oxi Day. Today in Greece, celebrations of Oxi Day culminate in a large, lavish military parade down the main boulevards of Athens and Thessoloniki. Soldiers, tanks, armoured vehicles and students parade through most Greek cities with an air of pride, and politicans in reviewing stands have an opportunity to show their own spirit to Greece and the resistance and how in future generations it should be continued. For tourists and foreigners, it's a proud spectacle to behold, so if you're ever in Greece during that time, be sure and see it!

amadeus2050 on October 28, 2012

Nice composition. LIKE. Best wishes.

amadeus2050.

varkos on October 31, 2012

Πολύ καλή σύνθεση!

BOGDAN de Varsovie on November 10, 2012

Wonderfully composed picture. LIKE 4.

Best regards.

Bogdan

Vasilis Anastopoulos on November 21, 2012

η Ελλάδα που αντιστέκεται η Ελλάδα που επιμένει!

Πολύ όμορφη οπτική γωνία. Αρέσει

Stylianos Kanakaris … on December 21, 2012

Καλά Χριστούγεννα και Ευτυχισμένος ο καινούριος χρόνος Δεσποινακι μου γλυκό ! υγεία φιλενάδα !!!

Xristos Ntavarinos on December 24, 2012

χρόνια πολλά. ότι καλύτερο για το 2013

Vassiliki Argiriou on April 6, 2013

Υπέροχη φωτογραφία, γαλανόλευκη κι πολύ ΑΑγαπημένη! Χαιρετισμούς!

Henu Eins on May 24, 2013

THE PERFECT PICTURE...COMPLIMENT...L+F.....Greetings heiner

petinaki on May 24, 2013

Σας ευχαριστώ πάρα πολύ για όλα!

Thank you so much!!!

CHO PIGU on June 8, 2013

Incredibly beautiful!!

L&F

ちょぴぐ Greetings from Japan。

Alireza Javaheri on July 22, 2013

░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░░

░░░░░░░░░░ Very Nice Shot ░░░░░░░░

░░░░░░░░░░░░L I K E░░░░░░░░░░░░

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Mher Ishkhanyan on September 3, 2013

Very beutiful!L+F

Spiros_PT on September 22, 2013

Very nice capture!

Di0m3d3s on April 23, 2014

ausgezeichnet in Szene gesetzt!

Es ist passend, wie stolz die griechische Flagge im Wind weht!

YS + Like

Viele Grüße aus Halle in Mitteldeutschland!

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on October 28, 2012
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by petinaki
    • Camera: Canon PowerShot A3100 IS
    • Taken on 2011/06/22 15:11:10
    • Exposure: 0.002s (1/640)
    • Focal Length: 6.20mm
    • F/Stop: f/8.000
    • ISO Speed: ISO160
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash

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