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Jharokha - Patwon-Ki-Haveli ©Anupam

As described in Wikipedia : A jharokha (or jharoka) is a type of overhanging enclosed balcony used in Indian architecture, typically rajputana architecture, Mughal architecture, and Rajasthani architecture. Jharokhas jutting forward from the wall plane could be used both for adding to the architectural beauty of the building itself or for a specific purpose. One of the most important functions it served was to allow women in purdah to see the events outside without being seen themselves. Alternatively, these windows could also be used to position archers and spies. Jharokha – A stone window projecting from the wall face of a building, in an upper storey, overlooking a street, market, court or any other open space. It is supported on two or more brackets or corbelling, has two pillars or pilaster, balustrade and a cupola or pyramidical roof; technically closed by jalies but generally partly open for the inmates to peep out to see passing processions. It is more formal and ornamental than English or French “oriel” or and in fact, jharokha is one of the most distinctive characteristic of the façade in medieval Rajputana and Muslim Architecture down to 19th century A Jharokha is a type of overhanging enclosed balcony used in Indian architecture, typically Rajasthani architecture and Mughal architecture. Jharokhas jutting forward from the wall plane could be used both for adding to the architectural beauty of the building itself or for a specific purpose. Alternatively, these windows could also be used to position archers and spies. The projected balcony, which is an essential element of the rajasthani Architecture both as decoration and as a viewing platform. The chajjas, sloping eaves that projected out above the balconies, increasing protection from both the summer sun and monsoon rain. Jharokha is used due to: Aesthetic appearance Climatic aspects Elevation treatment allow women in purdah to see the events outside without being seen themselves Jharokhas are mainly used in Palaces, Havelis and Temples.

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on October 29, 2012
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Anupam Mukherjee
    • Camera: Canon PowerShot S5 IS
    • Taken on 2012/10/20 13:15:10
    • Exposure: 0.003s (1/400)
    • Focal Length: 31.20mm
    • F/Stop: f/7.100
    • ISO Speed: ISO80
    • Exposure Bias: 0.00 EV
    • No flash