Rundblick vom Grossmuenster, Zuerich, ZH, Switzerland

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View from the West Tower of Zurich's largest Church.

The Grossmünster is a Romanesque-style Protestant church in Zurich, Switzerland. It is one of the three major churches in the city (the others being the Fraumünster and St. Peterskirche). The core of the present building near the banks of the Limmat River was constructed on the site of a Carolingian church, which was, according to legend, originally commissioned by Charlemagne. Construction of the present structure commenced around 1100 and it was inaugurated around 1220. The Grossmünster was a monastery church, vying for precedence with the Fraumünster across the Limmat throughout the Middle Ages. According to legend, the Grossmünster was founded by Charlemagne, whose horse fell to its knees over the tombs of Felix and Regula, Zürich's patron saints. The legend helps support a claim of seniority over the Fraumünster, which was founded by Louis the German, Charlemagne's grandson. Recent archaeological evidence confirms the presence of a Roman burial ground at the site.

Historical significance

Ulrich Zwingli initiated the Swiss-German Reformation in Switzerland from his pastoral office at the Grossmünster, starting in 1520. Zwingli won a series of debates presided over by the magistrate in 1523 which ultimately led local civil authorities to sanction the severance of the church from the papacy. The reforms initiated by Zwingli and continued by his successor, Heinrich Bullinger, account for the plain interior of the church. The iconoclastic reformers removed the organ and religious statuary in 1524. These changes, accompanied by abandonment of Lent, replacement of the Mass, disavowal of celibacy, eating meat on fast days, replacement of the lectionary with a seven-year New Testament cycle, a ban on church music, and other significant reforms make this church one of the most important sites in the history of the reformation and the birthplace of the Swiss-German reformation.

Source: www.Wikipedia.org

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Comments (26)

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Schwiemonster on December 17, 2012

...der Nabel der Welt ;-) Ein Superfoto! like LG. Ellen

Auggie on December 29, 2012

Vielen Dank Schwiemonster! Cheers from Canada! Auggie

Popi Braga on February 11, 2013

Not for who suffers from vertigo like me! Very nice work Auggie! YsL1/8. Ciao, Popi

Auggie on February 12, 2013

Popi, mille grazie & saluti da Toronto, Auggie

salfredo on March 17

YSL und Gruss

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  • Uploaded on November 4, 2012
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    by Auggie

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