Gregory of Nin/Grgur Ninski,Split,Croatia

Selected for Google Maps and Google Earth

The statue of Gregory of Nin by Ivan Meštrović in Split is a heavily trafficked tourist site in the town, which the toe of the statue shows. Rubbing the statue's toe is said to bring good luck. The toe has been worn smooth and shiny as a result. The statue was originally located in the Peristyle of Diocletian's Palace and can be seen in postcards of the pre-World War II period. During World War II, the statue was moved outside the city by Italian occupying forces. Currently, the statue sits to the north of the Palace and Old Town of Split, just outside the Golden Gate. There are also statues of Gregory of Nin in the cities of Nin, Croatia and Varaždin, Croatia. Gregory of Nin (Croatian: Grgur Ninski, pronounced [ɡr̩̂ɡuːr nîːnskiː]) was a medieval Croatian bishop of Nin who strongly opposed the Pope and official circles of the Church and introduced the national language in the religious services after the Great Assembly in 926, according to traditional Croatian historiography. Until that time, services were held only in Latin, not being understandable to the majority of the population. Not only was this important for Croatian language and culture but it also made the religion stronger within the Croatian kingdom

Show more
Show less
Save Cancel Want to use bold, italic, links?

Sign up to comment. Sign in if you already did it.

Photo details

  • Uploaded on November 5, 2012
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by Senad Džinić (Džine)
    • Camera: SONY DSC-T10

Groups