Teewah Coloured Sands and the Carlo Sand Blow, Rainbow Beach, Queensland

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Comments (8)

Tewbacka on November 10, 2012

Nice! cheers Gary

Ian Stehbens on November 10, 2012

No shortage of sand around there, Gary. And plenty of special fishing spots too, estuarine as well as from the surf beach.

Regards,

Ian

bdeh on November 10, 2012

Wow, what a beautiful environment Ian. Greetings Berend

Ian Stehbens on November 10, 2012

Thanks Berend.

Of course, I love it too.

The big sandblow pictured is called the Carlo Sandblow. I would imagine that it has occurred as the result of a fire destroying the bush covering the dune, but it may also have been human traffic that exposed the dune crest to the wind. Once the cover is broken it is very difficult to stop the wind erosion.

The fragility of the dune environment requires very strict measures to protect the dunes.

There is quite a sizeable settlement just behind the dunes - the roofs of some houses are just visible.

Ian

bdeh on November 10, 2012

The erosion is the reason that most of our dunes are prohibited Ian. The dunes are our natural dikes against the sea. Here one plants Marraw grass to stop the erosion. Greetings Berend

Ian Stehbens on November 10, 2012

They are very critical here too, though less is at stake in Australia than in Netherlands. There are many stretches of coast where development in the past built on the dunes, and in places like that beach replenishment is essential using sand pumped ashore. And that is costly. Protecting the dunes is a far better approach, I agree.

Regards,

Ian

ebi lutze on November 11, 2012

Hi Ian *from the group A1-Unique Australia . a other great capture **L. Is that gap in the middle men made or natural ? Regards Ebi

Ian Stehbens on November 11, 2012

Hi Ebi. The gap in the middle is Carlo Sandblow. I am not sure of its origin, but it is likely that the cover on the dune crest was damaged either by fire, or by human access or interference, and from that point on the wind erosion naturally continues to deflate the dune, opening up a large sandblow that moves sand inland burying vegetation. So in short, the process is natural but the trigger was most likely some human interference.

The ecosystem on the dunes is very fragile.

Ian

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Photo taken in Rainbow Beach - Double Island Point Rd, Rainbow Beach QLD 4581, Australia

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  • Uploaded on November 9, 2012
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    by Ian Stehbens

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