Victorian Colour Photo of Dover Castle, Seafront, and White Cliffs, England, UK

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Derived from a United States Library of Congress photomechanical print dated circa 1890-1900. Promenade Pier (right: built 1893, demolished 1927) stood opposite Burlington Hotel above Waterloo Crescent on Marine Parade (left). Body of World War I heroine, Nurse Edith Cavell landed at pier in 1919. Kent seaside pebble beach. History, Travel, Tourism, and Vacation.

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Comments (3)

John Latter on March 27, 2013

This is number five in a series of six victorian photographs. Two show closer views of Dover Castle:

Victorian Colour Photo of Dover Castle from Connaught Park, United Kingdom

And:

Victorian Colour Photo of Connaught Park and Dover Castle, Kent, England, UK

One shows a close-up of the iconic cliffs:

Victorian Colour Photo of the White Cliffs of Dover, United Kingdom

Another shows the White Cliffs of Dover on the other side of town (and explains this particular landmark's connection to William Shakespeare and his play, King Lear):

Victorian Colour Photo of Shakespeare Cliff, Dover, United Kingdom

A link to the final photo will appear in a later comment.

Dover Promenade Pier (1)

Dover Promenade Pier was built between 1892 and 1893 and provided a bandstand and a landing stage on the west side. The engineer was John James Webster and the contractor was Alfred Thorne. The pier opened on 22nd May 1893, and is thought to have cost about GBP 24,000, however this may also have included the later Pier Pavilion.

Dover Promenade Pier was similar in design to Bangor Garth Pier (still extant in 2007), also constructed by Webster and Thorne. Just six months after it opened, The 'Christine' collided with it during November 1893. About 100 foot of the pier was destroyed during a storm the following year. After repairs, the pier re-opened on 4th August 1895. In 1899, a Pier Pavilion was added designed by the architect J.W. Adcock.

In 1913, the admiralty purchased the pier to be used for landing purposes but it returned to its original use as a pleasure pier after the First World War. Steamer trips from Dover to Hastings were again carried out. However by 1925 the pier had become dilapidated and it was demolished two years later in 1927.

(1) Abridged from the English Heritage Pastscape entry: Dover Promenade Pier

The Landscape Today

The photo was taken from the Clock Tower end of the beach near the Prince of Wales Pier. A similar modern day view is shown at:

Autumn Panorama of the Beach and Seafront, Dover Harbour

The first two blocks of buildings in from the left-hand edge of the photo are part of the late Georgian Waterloo Crescent, a Dover Listed Building:

Golden Panorama of the Victorian Waterloo Crescent at Sunrise, Dover

The buildings to the right of Waterloo Crescent have been replaced by the Gateway Flats:

Pebble Beach, Seafront, Gateway Flats, and Dover Castle

Above the Dover Promenade Pier, East Cliff remains unchanged but the Eastern Docks and its sea ferry terminal are now exist:

Houses of East Cliff Marine Parade, White Cliffs of Dover

And:

Night Panorama of the Ferry Terminal and Eastern Docks of Dover Harbour

Finally, mustn't forget to include modern views of:

Panorama of the White Cliffs of Dover in Sunlight and Shadow

And:

The Western Outer Curtain Wall of Dover Castle from the Harbour

The castle is a Dover English Heritage site (Grade I Listed Building and Scheduled Ancient Monument).

John Latter / Jorolat

Dover Blog: The Psychology of a Small Town

This is the Images of Dover website: click on any red or blue "John Latter" link to access the Entry Page.

John Latter on March 30, 2013

The final Victorian Colour Photo showing the Western Docks area of the port and the English Channel::

Victorian Colour Photo of the Admiralty Pier, Dover Harbour, United Kingdom

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on March 27, 2013
  • © All Rights Reserved
    by John Latter
    • Taken on 2013/03/25 03:16:50

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