Fourth anniversary of the opening of the Acropolis Museum 20 June

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Metopes

Main article: Metopes of the Parthenon

The ninety-two metopes were carved in high relief, a practice employed until then only in treasuries (buildings used to keep votive gifts to the gods). According to the building records, the metope sculptures date to the years 446–440 BC. Their design is attributed to the sculptor Kalamis. The metopes of the east side of the Parthenon, above the main entrance, depict the Gigantomachy (mythical battles between the Olympian gods and the Giants). The metopes of the west end show Amazonomachy (mythical battle of the Athenians against the Amazons). The metopes of the south side show the Thessalian Centauromachy (battle of the Lapiths aided by Theseus against the half-man, half-horse Centaurs). Metopes 13–21 are missing, but drawings from 1674 attributed to Jaques Carrey indicate a series of humans; these have been interpreted as scenes from the Lapith wedding, scenes from the early history of Athens and various myths.On the north side of the Parthenon, the metopes are poorly preserved, but the subject seems to be the sack of Troy.

The metopes present surviving traces of the Severe Style in the anatomy of the figures' heads, in the limitation of the corporal movements to the contours and not to the muscles, and in the presence of pronounced veins in the figures of the Centauromachy. Several of the metopes still remain on the building, but, with the exception of those on the northern side, they are severely damaged. Some of them are located at the Acropolis Museum, others are in the British Museum, and one can be seen at the Louvre museum.

In March 2011, archaeologists announced that they had discovered five metopes of the Parthenon in the south wall of the Acropolis, which had been extended when the Acropolis was used as a fortress. According to Eleftherotypia daily, the archaeologists claimed the metopes had been placed there in the 18th century, when the Acropolis wall was being repaired. The experts discovered the metopes, while processing 2250 photos with modern photographic methods, as the white Pentelic marble they are made of differed from the other stone of the wall. It was previously presumed that the missing metopes were destroyed during the Morosini explosion of the Parthenon, in 1687.(wikipedia)

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Comments (94)

Giorgos Dimitriadis on July 7, 2013

Thanks a lot Tosa for kind comment and YsL 22/42

BernardJ47 on July 8, 2013

L+F. Piękny kadr. Piękna prezentacja. Interesujące miejsce. Pozdrawia Bernard

Giorgos Dimitriadis on July 8, 2013

Thanks a lot Bernard for nice comment and YsL 23/43

Slavа on July 14, 2013

Excellent composition!!! LIKE 44 & YS 24 Greetings, Slava.

Giorgos Dimitriadis on July 14, 2013

Thanks a lot Slava for kind comment and YsL 24/44

Ilie Olar on July 30, 2013

Very nice interior view! YSL! Greetings from Romania, Ilie

Giorgos Dimitriadis on July 30, 2013

Thanks a lot Ilie for nice comment and YsL 25/45

GeorgeDimitriadis on August 4, 2013

Thanks a lot Mariano for kind comment and YsL 26/46

Sebastian “Käptn” Is… on February 11, 2014

That´s beautiful 26/47

Giorgos Dimitriadis on February 11, 2014

Thanks a lot Käptn Iso for nice comment and YsL 26/47

Maciej K on July 19

One year ago. 27*/48

Giorgos Dimitriadis on July 19

Thanks a lot Maciejk for kind comment and YsL 27/48

LIKE & FAVORITE :)))

KEEP PANORAMIO ALIVE!

Giorgos Dimitriadis 6 days ago

Thanks a lot ►③Hnos GP Brothers③◄ for YsL 28/49

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Photo details

  • Uploaded on June 21, 2013
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    by Giorgos Dimitriadis
    • Camera: NIKON CORPORATION NIKON D80
    • Taken on 2013/06/20 20:38:55
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