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Colombian Architect living in USA,Really Like Photography and Travelling

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Mike Fowkes - Many thanks for your visit into my photo-gallery and your comment – Best regards from Athens

Mike Fowkes - Many thanks for your visit into my photo-gallery and your comment – Best regards from Athens

Thank you very much Giuseppe Lazzara greetings from Nutley, New Jersey

Beautiful! Like & Fav. Greetings, Dmitry

Construction of the building began in 1922 based on the design by the prominent architectural firm of Kiehnel and Elliott. Richard Kiehnel and J. B. Elliott often tried to give buildings an aged look and were proponents of the Mediterranean Revival style. Buildings they designed include the Seybold Building, Miami High School, Coral Gables Congregational Church and El Jardin. The principal elevation is characterized by an entrance portico with four stylized Doric columns dividing the main façade into three bays. The columns extend to a height of two stories and are capped by a triangular pediment. The inscription on the entablature reads: “Scottish Rite.” The portico is ornamented with four large, two-headed eagles placed above each column axis. A gableend roof is visible behind the eagle sculptures. The building’s configuration presents a “T” shape plan with projecting lower wing to the northeast. The principal elevation of the wing is characterized by a colonnade delineated by similar stylized Doric columns and an articulated masonry entablature. The roof of the square block has a ziggurat with a massive single-headed eagle on each of the minor faces. A cupola caps the ziggurat. The walls of the building are clad in smooth stucco. A set of masonry steps lead from the sidewalk level to the entrance. The steps span the width of the main façade and emphasize the Grecian overtones present in the design. Most of the fenestration has been replaced by awning-type windows set into aluminum frames. A masonry dentil course wraps around the perimeter of the building at the height of the entablature.

Construction of the building began in 1922 based on the design by the prominent architectural firm of Kiehnel and Elliott. Richard Kiehnel and J. B. Elliott often tried to give buildings an aged look and were proponents of the Mediterranean Revival style. Buildings they designed include the Seybold Building, Miami High School, Coral Gables Congregational Church and El Jardin. The principal elevation is characterized by an entrance portico with four stylized Doric columns dividing the main façade into three bays. The columns extend to a height of two stories and are capped by a triangular pediment. The inscription on the entablature reads: “Scottish Rite.” The portico is ornamented with four large, two-headed eagles placed above each column axis. A gableend roof is visible behind the eagle sculptures. The building’s configuration presents a “T” shape plan with projecting lower wing to the northeast. The principal elevation of the wing is characterized by a colonnade delineated by similar stylized Doric columns and an articulated masonry entablature. The roof of the square block has a ziggurat with a massive single-headed eagle on each of the minor faces. A cupola caps the ziggurat. The walls of the building are clad in smooth stucco. A set of masonry steps lead from the sidewalk level to the entrance. The steps span the width of the main façade and emphasize the Grecian overtones present in the design. Most of the fenestration has been replaced by awning-type windows set into aluminum frames. A masonry dentil course wraps around the perimeter of the building at the height of the entablature.

Oaks Hotel and Apartments 421 NW 3rd Street This building was constructed prior to 1918 in the Frame Vernacular style of architecture (Photograph 3). The rectangular plan building is supported by a frame structural system that is clad in asbestos shingles, although its exterior walls were originally covered with wood siding. The building sits on concrete block piers and is capped by a gable roof covered in composition roll roofing. A recessed porch at the first story characterizes the principal elevation of the building. The width of the elevation is divided into three bays by flat wood pilasters extending from the first through third floors. The gable roof has its gable end facing the street and adds a half story to the height of the building. A simple wooden balustrade around its perimeter delineates the first floor porch. A two-story auxiliary building is located at the rear of the property. This frame apartment building represents a fine example of Frame Vernacular architecture in Miami-Dade County between 1910 and 1920. It is architecturally noteworthy for its size, adaptability to the area’s climate, cohesiveness within the neighborhood and straightforward, functional character.

Welcome to the group Churches of the world, keep adding Church pictures to the group

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