Bruce Comfort
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I'm a retired engineer. I ride a 400cc Suzuki Burgman motorscooter and I live in Oamaru, South Island of New Zealand. I have two adult daughters. My interests (if you haven't worked it out) include New Zealand's heritage of engineering works, snapshot photography of the built environment and recording pastoral farming activities around here. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PLEASE NOTE THAT MANY PHOTOGRAPHS ON THIS PANORAMIO SITE HAVE BEEN TAKEN BY ACCESSING HERITAGE BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES, AND ENGINEERING ARTIFACTS WHICH LIE ON PRIVATE LAND. PUBLICATION OF PHOTOGRAPHS ON THIS SITE DOES NOT IMPLY ANY PUBLIC RIGHTS OF ACCESS. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PLEASE ALSO NOTE THAT A FEW PHOTOS ON THIS SITE ARE NOT MINE, AND THAT MANY ARE TAKEN INDOORS AND ARE OF MACHINERY AND THAT THIS APPARENTLY CONTRADICTS THE TERMS OF USE OF THE PANORAMIO WEBSITE. I HAVE HAD THE SITE MODERATORS' APPROVAL FOR USING THE SITE THIS WAY AS ALL SUCH PHOTOS LINK IN SOME FASHION TO MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS OF PLACES IN NEW ZEALAND WHERE ARTIFACTS OF ENGINEERING OR PASTORAL OR INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE CAN STILL BE FOUND. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MY INTENTION IS NOT TO USURP THE RIGHTS OF THE HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHERS NOR OF COPYRIGHT OWNERS, AND CREDIT IS GIVEN WHERE I CAN. I have made an endeavour to contact copyright holders of material published on these pages and where appropriate, permission is still being sought for these items. Where replies were not received, or where the copyright owner has not been able to be traced, or where the permission is still being sought, I have decided, in good faith, to proceed with publication. I would be happy to hear from copyright owners at any time to discuss usage of item. IF YOU GO TO THE PLACES WHERE MY OWN PHOTOGRAPHS HAVE BEEN ACCEPTED BY THE MODERATORS TO BE IN THE PHOTOS LAYER ON GOOGLE EARTH, MY HOPE IS THAT THE OTHER HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHS (which will not have been accepted by the moderators of Google Earth but which appear on these pages) WILL STIMULATE YOU TO THINK ABOUT THE ENGINEERS, ENTREPRENEURS, INVESTORS, THE WORKERS AND OPERATORS AND ALL THE PEOPLE, NOW GONE, WHOSE LIVES WERE INEXTRICABLY TIED TO THESE PLACES AND THESE ENDEAVOURS. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- MY E-MAIL ADDRESS IS guyro@slingshot.co.nz AND I WELCOME INPUT INTO THIS WORK -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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This kiln is said to have been built by Edward Elworthy, who was the owner of Holm Station, around 1882 and it is near the remains of another small kiln (the hearth of which can be seen to the right in the frontal view Francis Vallance photo on Panoramio/Google Earth) erected by an Edward Le Cren in 1865. The kiln was once in the ownership of the Vincent family (of Ashburton Gorge limekilns fame) and is thought to have ceased burning in the late 1920s

This photograph was obtained with the access to the building granted by Mojo Coffee Company. The building is private property and no right of public access exists as far as I am aware. Inasmuch as Mojo encourages people to enter a small part of the building behind a yellow line, to look and purchase coffee beans etc, it is reasonable to say that some of this historic apparatus can be seen "through the door"

This shot shows the splices and eyes and shackles and the single sheave wooden pulley suspended itself on wire cable, which runs along the length of the building on both sides and is attached in what seems an arbitrary fashion to any supporting member of the roof structure that is in the right place. The sag in this supporting cable would be exaggerated on lifting a load so one can presume that the loads were light by "crane" standards.

This photograph was obtained with the access to the building granted by Mojo Coffee Company. The building is private property and no right of public access exists as far as I am aware. Inasmuch as Mojo encourages people to enter a small part of the building behind a yellow line, to look and purchase coffee beans etc, it is reasonable to say that some of this historic apparatus can be seen "through the door"

At this point (above the moving sheaves on the ram portion of the whim) the pulling rope is rope! and wrapped in thin strips of line or canvas?. About two metres further out the rope is spliced into an eye and connected to the wire rope section of the pulling cable - itself in multiple pieces with eyes and shackles and attachments for the vertical lifting ropes.

Fine yes, but windy too! Strong North Westerly winds are common in Wellington, and they arise from the orientation of Cook Strait.

Soames Island has had many functions during European times - it's mostly remembered as a quarantine station and as the place where people from various countries with whom NZ and the British Commonwealth were at war - "aliens" being incarcerated there,despite them being long term citizens in the country

It is now administered by the Department of Conservation and is accessible at any time without specific permission.

This lovely house once stood in Papanui Road Merivale, Christchurch but it was demolished in about 2006 to build a few truly horrible motel units.

I had one look inside the house when it was still occupied. It was beautiful (dated of course) with a tiled fireplace in Minimalist Art Deco style with cream glazed tiles and chromium decoration as I recall.

The curved glass in steel framed windows is very unusual - although there does appear to have been two similar houses built by the same designer/architect/builder in Papanui Road and even one (possibly)in Oamaru.

Beauty! Greetings from HongKong,Like

Here you can see the mouth of the furnace of one of the two smaller kilns built by Sophia McDonald on Flat top Hill.

The pattern of brick laying shows the ends of conventional rectangular fire bricks. The circular furnace was shaped by laying bricks in courses with the fronts touching and the backs spaced as quadrants. Once fine beach sand (mainly from basalt) was poured into the wedge shaped joins the whole course would "lock" dirt from around the site would then be backfilled as the "castle wall" of the furnace out the front grew apace. Because the forces on a working kiln are all outward, the castle wall has a generous back-slope on its three sides.

One might speculate that we will never now know the top-to-bottom condition of this furnace as it is full of dirt and rocks.

This is the last of three furnaces built on Flat Top Hill by Sophia McDonald [one of the two daughters of James McDonald] who continued her father's business interests in lime burning in the Oamaru/Alma/Kakanui area after his death. Constructed in 1902 the first kiln (see Kiln 1 and Kiln 2 photos) was erected to replace the diminishing resource on Fortification Road where professional geological interest in the fossils in the limestone there had convinced James McDonald that it might be time to move on and to a site where more than one kiln could be erected to meet a growing demand for burnt lime. After a bureaucratic nightmare, Sophia had a tramway built to connect this new site with Whitecraig's Siding on the relatively new rail line to Dunedin. The kiln was served by a small steam locomotive that brought coal to Flat Top Hill and took burnt lime away to the siding, and which, in addition, served as a sometimes conduit for vegetables grown on the rich tar soils of the area by a steadily increasing community of (mainly) Cantoneses Chinese vegetable gardeners who were moving to Oamaru to establish commercial gardens. This community still exists in greatly decreased numbers working greatly increased acreages per family.

The history of the McDonald Tramway has been written by >>>>>> in the >>>>>>issue of the NZ RailFan magazine.

The line of the tramway formation (which was constructed in two stages - see further information under images of McDonald's Kakanui Kilns on these pages) can be traced on the ground and in aerial photographs. Its construction date of after 1900 precluded its demolition and the uplifting and removal of the way being prevented or at least discouraged by the proviosions of the Historic Places Act which otherwise go some way towards protecting archaeological relices of our pre 1900 history.

This is one of a series of photographs taken by me to help build this website. http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/map/memorials-register-map Visitors to New Zealand with an interest in our history may find this a valuable resource,

This is one of a series of photographs taken by me to help build this website. http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/map/memorials-register-map Visitors to New Zealand with an interest in our history may find this a valuable resource,

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