Jim Millard
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All photos Copyright © James P. Millard. Contact photographer for permission. Jim Millard is a Senior Instructional Designer/Technologist at Saint Michael's College in Vermont, a local maritime history author and the publisher of the America's Historic Lakes website- http://www.historiclakes.org. Jim is the author of four books to date- "Bastions on the Border- the Great Stone Forts at Rouses Point on Lake Champlain," "Fort Montgomery Through the Years," "The Secrets of Crab Island," and "Lake Passages- A Journey Through the Centuries." Please note that Jim's photos are posted here for your enjoyment and reference and may not be used in any way without permission of the photographer.

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Founder and Governor of New France. Tenacious and farseeing, an idealist devoting his life to founding an empire to be ruled "with justice and mercy by France, but for God". Yet in 1609 unwittingly, inaugurated the series of conflicts with the Iroquois' Five Nations that would "play havoc and flame to generations of yet unborn", as he assisted Algonquian and Huron Indians in their war with the Iroquois (near present Ticonderoga) who in turn enlisted the Dutch and English in their cause. Perhaps the New World's greatest explorer. Not only discovering the lake that bears his name, but also making trips to other distant destinations like the West Indies, Mexico, Canada and Cape Cod. See Morris Bishop: Champlain, The life of fortitude (1948). The Memorial seems majestic in Jim's photo.

His name is synonymous with treason. Had fate dealt him a kinder hand, it would be with bravery instead. Read his life, walk a mile in his shoes, and judge him then. What a pity if you don't.

A strategic command point between Lakes George and Champlain during the French and Indian War (1755-63). Originally built by the French and named Fort Carillon in 1755, gallantly defended by Montcalm in 1758 against Abercromby. It fell to Amherst in 1759 and renamed Fort Ticonderoga. Benedict Arnold and Ethan Allen subdued its garrison at the outbreak of the Revolution in 1775. Arthur St. Clair abandoned it to the British without a fight in 1777. This national treasure I find unequal as a relic of American history. The photo speaks for itself.

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA

What a shot! The birthplace of a legend. Look closer and judge for yourself. "Did he slid down the slide that today bears his name? Or didn't he?". It seems an incredible feat to achieve. On the other hand, Rogers the Ranger WAS an incredible man. I think he did anyway!

Photo by Jim Millard. Copyright © 2008 America's Historic Lakes, South Hero, VT USA This ancient warehouse dates from 1823, the year the Champlain Canal opened. It is believed to have been constructed of stone from the original Fort Ticonderoga, just across the lake.

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