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Diva’s cave or den (local people call it also “Divina-Pećina”) is positioned at the north part of the Great Bogočin. Its name “Diva” is related to old Slavic deity that symbolizes darkness and winter; it is seen as the Grim Reaper and dwells in pitch dark dens or gloomy woods. Ancient Slavic people developed abstract personification of divine functions in the form of the concepts such as Pravo/Krivo (Right/Wrong) or Crno/Bijelo (Black White). White or Right Gods (e.g. Svantovid, Swarog, Perun) were positioned at sunny part of the Great or Small Bogočin whereas Diva as Black God (also called Crnobog) took position in the oak woods at the north side. These Gods are continuously in fight which is seen as day/night exchanges or alternation between summer and winter seasons.

In local Dalmatian dialect the world "TROVRA" (in Standard Croatian “TRI VRHA”) means simply "THREE PEAKS". This ancient name is related with Troglav (the highest peak of Dinara) or Triglav (both names simply means Three-headed) in Slovenia (hills of the Slovenia's flag!). This name roots in ancient Slavic religion that was local and cultic in nature. Triglav was the central part of the (holy) trinity including Swarog (god of the Sun), Svatovid (victory in the war, harvest, and commerce) and Perun (heavenly God of thunder and lightning, giver of rain to farmers, god of war and weapons, invoked by fighters) and maybe some of God-Sons such as Svarožić or Božić. Doubtless, some of these or similar Gods in Slavic Parthenon were certainly worshipped as supreme by certain Croatian (and other Slavic) tribes.

In local Dalmatian dialect the world "TROVRA" (in Standard Croatian “TRI VRHA”) means simply "THREE PEAKS". This ancient name is related with Troglav (the highest peak of Dinara) or Triglav (both names simply means Three-headed) in Slovenia (hills of the Slovenia's flag!). This name roots in ancient Slavic religion that was local and cultic in nature. Triglav was the central part of the (holy) trinity including Swarog (god of the Sun), Svatovid (victory in the war, harvest, and commerce) and Perun (heavenly God of thunder and lightning, giver of rain to farmers, god of war and weapons, invoked by fighters) and maybe some of God-Sons such as Svarožić or Božić. Doubtless, some of these or similar Gods in Slavic Parthenon were certainly worshipped as supreme by certain Croatian (and other Slavic) tribes.

This photo was shot from south (close to old Nevest-Cera primary school building). Gradina from Nevest-Cera with its rich history spanning over 5000 years still waits to be properly examined and documented.

The typical ambience Dalmatian old village in the Dalmatinska Zagora (sort of Dalmatian Highland, in German: Dalmatinische Wald). Stare Budiše means the old village of Budiša.

This photo was shot from St Antony's Church Hill in Primosrki Dolac in July 2008. Praća is long hill at the south part of Primorski Dolac; behind are villages of Lubitovica and Prapatnica. At Praća is also “Vidova Gradina” the area of old sacrificial place marked with stone walls. “Vid” is related to old Croatian God Svantovid, associated with the victory in the war, harvest or commerce and represented with four heads. It was worshiped at the other places as well; see e.g. Great (Veliki) Bogočin between Nevest-Cera, Koprno and Unešić.

This photo was shot from St Antony's Church Hill in Primorski Dolac in July 2008. Bakovići make north-east part of Primorski Dolac; behind are hills belonging to the villages of Bogdanovići (Sratok).

One of the oldest grave stone (most probably type of the medieval "stećak"), that still could be seen in the St. Mary Church’s Cemetery of the Nevest-Cera. Note that the stone hat cross form with the star "Danica" (i.e. Croatian name for Venus) and moon - an ancient Croatian sign (see coat of arms at Croatian flag). It is very ancient sign that has nothing to do with Islamic half-moon and star (which are historically younger signs).

This beautiful color play comes from Mediterranean maple; photographed in autumn 2007.

Some 50 years ago here was living the richest man in Nevest-Cera. His name was Petar and nickname “Petrić” (‘small Petar’) after he and his wife (Stana) died (many years ago) their house (proudly called ‘Kula’ – ‘castle’) is today – after all - just an interesting ruin.

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