Steven Spring
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CAPTURING OUR HERITAGE. Thanks for viewing my photos of yesteryear. Many years ago I enjoyed photographing our American cultural heritage...buildings and places of days gone by. When I moved back to Virginia, my interests gravitated to old grist mills with water wheels. In the days before cars and supermarkets, before modern methods of manufacture were developed, the settlers who carved a living out of the wilderness worked hard to provide the basic necessities of life. One of the most important mechanical devices used by early families to make life a little easier was the mill. At a time when steam engines and electricity were still in the future, mills harnessed the natural power of moving water. Though mills were built for many purposes, perhaps the most common were the grist mills, which ground grain for bread and feed for animals. Grain milling is one of the oldest industries in the history of mankind...The people went out and gathered it and ground it in mills (Numbers 11:8)... Once there were hundreds of mills scattered along streams and rivers throughout the country. Now most are gone, replaced by modern methods and electricity. My quest now is to document those mills that are still standing and perhaps provide a little history. Comments and suggestions are welcome. And thanks again for viewing my photos. Steve Spring, Millfoto Photography

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Built in 1865 of stone construction. Operations ceased in 1922. It has been renovated for use as a private residence. It was powered by steam.

At Burnt Prairie, just off I-64 on Liberty Road. All equipment is intact. The mill was started in 1833 by Andrew Smith in a nearby community, and was moved to Burnt Prairie. There were attempts to use the mill as an interpretive museum, but it is now closed.

Located in a city park, this windmill is a replica, built by the Hollard Dairy Co. It is not an operating mill.

In the restored village of Metamora. The mill, which is in operation, has been restored as part of an Indiana State Historic Site. There is a large breast waterwheel, set into a canal lock. The mill was rebuilt following a fire in 1899. A run of 42-inch millstones is used. Various types of flour as well as corn meal may be purchased at the gift shop.

In the restored village of Metamora. The mill, which is in operation, has been restored as part of an Indiana State Historic Site. There is a large breast waterwheel, set into a canal lock. The mill was rebuilt following a fire in 1899. A run of 42-inch millstones is used. Various types of flour as well as corn meal may be purchased at the gift shop.

aka Dewig Enterprises. Originally a flour mill using electricity. Now used as an elevator and does some custom grain milling.

South of Corydon, Indiana. The mill was rebuilt on the original foundation of the old mill. Original foundation stones with unique carvings are displayed at the gift shop. The log building has an overshot waterwheel with the water coming from the caverns in a long wooden flume. Be sure to enjoy the caverns while there.

aka Corydon Milling Co., its located at Maple Street at the Little Indian Creek. Charles Martin, Samuel Pfrimmer and John Loweth built the mill on the site of a much earlier mill. The Capitol Feed and Farm Center now occupies the mill. Originally the mill was powered by an overshot waterwheel to grind flour on buhrstones and later roller machinery.

Located in Spring Mill State Park on SR 60 about 3 miles east of Mitchell. The mill has been restored as part of a historic Hoosier village, with numerous log buildings. There is a hugh overshot waterwheel, with a long wooden flume which operates the millstones; an adjacent up-and-down sawmill is nearby.

aka Strain's/Dickson's Mill. In the village of Mansfield, on Mansfield Road, just off SR 59 and 7 miles south of US 36. The Mansfield Mill was built by Jacob Meakin Rohm on the site of an earlier mill built in 1820. The Rhom name can be seen above the front door of the mill, which has undergone extensive restoration. There is a wooden waterwheel for cosmetic purposes, but the mill is actually turbine powered. Early in 1995 the mill was donated to the State of Indiana which will continue to hold it open to visitors as a State Historic Site.

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