Steven Spring
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CAPTURING OUR HERITAGE. Thanks for viewing my photos of yesteryear. Many years ago I enjoyed photographing our American cultural heritage...buildings and places of days gone by. When I moved back to Virginia, my interests gravitated to old grist mills with water wheels. In the days before cars and supermarkets, before modern methods of manufacture were developed, the settlers who carved a living out of the wilderness worked hard to provide the basic necessities of life. One of the most important mechanical devices used by early families to make life a little easier was the mill. At a time when steam engines and electricity were still in the future, mills harnessed the natural power of moving water. Though mills were built for many purposes, perhaps the most common were the grist mills, which ground grain for bread and feed for animals. Grain milling is one of the oldest industries in the history of mankind...The people went out and gathered it and ground it in mills (Numbers 11:8)... Once there were hundreds of mills scattered along streams and rivers throughout the country. Now most are gone, replaced by modern methods and electricity. My quest now is to document those mills that are still standing and perhaps provide a little history. Comments and suggestions are welcome. And thanks again for viewing my photos. Steve Spring, Millfoto Photography
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Three date stones: “G.N.N. 1777’s,” “(HMH 1777” and “Sta & Sons, June 1902.” First stone stands for George Nixson, builder of mill; second for “In His Majesty’s Honor”—rather heady saying for Revolutionary period; last for addition of west wing. Just to the west, stone miller’s cottage, date stone “G.N. 1787.” To NE, a mid-19th century frame over log house, stone wing added 20th century.

Located at 124 S. Carroll St., built in the early 20th century. In 1933, various feeds: Frederick Growing Mash, Frederick Laying Mash, Gambrill's Chick Starter, Gambrill's Fattening Mash, Gambrill's Growing Mash, Gambrill's Laying Mash and Gambrill's Scratch Feed were sold to Robert Forsythe & Son Co. The building has been renovated for use as Joanie's Carroll Street Cafe. A 2.5 story stone building across the street was apparently used as a secondary warehouse with a connected enclosed walkover to the second story of both buildings.

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In the 1780s, General Otho Williams acquired the Ceresville tract, as reparation for service during the American Revolutionary War. General Williams constructed the Ceresville grist mill, the original Mansion house and a saw mill. This 1818 stone gristmill replaced the mill built c. 1795 and last operated as Kelly's Feed Mill. Cornelius Shriner acquired the mill sometimes before 1829. He and his son, Edward A. Shriner, developed this into the most productive grist mill in Maryland. At its peak it produced 60 barrels of flour per day. Annually about 100,000 bushels of wheat were ground and 25,000 bushels of hops. The brand names of Snow Drift and Pure Gold flours were used through the 19th and 20th centuries. Also produced were corn meal, hominy, and stock feed. c. 1850, waterpower was supplemented by steam, then electricity later in the 1890s. The son Edward continued the mill after his father died in 1854 and built the current Mansion in 1888 as a wedding anniversary gift to his wife. In 1903 the mill was sold to Felton family who operated it until 1947. Then sold it to the Kelly family. The Kelly Feed Mill closed in 1988. The Kelly family sold the mill to someone who thought he could resell the structure at a quick profit. The flour making machinery, including the roller milling process, could all function, and were in good condition, but the new owner, thinking no one would want to run or would know how to run a flour mill, cleaned out the mill's office of all records, and began removing the flour mill machinery. The mill sat vacant for about 20 years; then, some alternative use plans were formulated. One plan was to renovate to accommodate a church congregation. Apparently this didn't materialize.

Located at 124 S. Carroll St., built in the early 20th century. In 1933, various feeds: Frederick Growing Mash, Frederick Laying Mash, Gambrill's Chick Starter, Gambrill's Fattening Mash, Gambrill's Growing Mash, Gambrill's Laying Mash and Gambrill's Scratch Feed were sold to Robert Forsythe & Son Co. The building has been renovated for use as Joanie's Carroll Street Cafe. A 2.5 story stone building across the street was apparently used as a secondary warehouse with a connected enclosed walkover to the second story of both buildings.

AKA General Engineering Company was ravaged by fire on June 30, 2010. The building had witnessed three centuries of city history. It was constructed in stages through the 1700, 1800s and 1900s - and sits on the site where gunlocks were manufactured during the American Revolution from 1777 to 1783. In the 1860s, it was home to John E. Sifford Steam Marble Works until at least 1887. In that year, the A.J. Delashmutt Fertilizer Factory purchased it, and it changed over to the E. E. Delashmutt Fertilizer Factory by 1904. By 1911, the building housed Ramsburg Fertilizer Company, which held the building until 1930.

great photo, I am photographing some of Delaware's houses. We overlapped on spocott mill in Cambridge Md you have some great shots

Looks like the best shot of this location on Panoramio, and thanks for the excellent background work!

Good photo and research! Thanks.

A number of grist and saw mills operated on this site from the late 1700s to the mid-1930s. Due to seasonal changes in the water level, Little Bennett Creek proved unreliable as a constant source of power to turn the water wheel. Milling effeciency improved with the installation of steam powered roller machinery around 1905. Following a devastating fire in 1918, the Hyattstown community assisted in the reconstruction using materials from nearby Price's Distillery. As technology and marketing changed, many country mills like Hyattstown Mill closed. The mill became part of Little Bennett Regional Park in 1965.

It's an internal (lens) flare, commonly caused when camera is pointed towards a direct light source such as the sun.

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