Justin Zimmerman
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A polarizing filter, as used here, cuts through the glare of a body of water and shows it appearing as clear as glass. I use this pic as wallpaper on my computer screen during the cold winter months to remind me of better times!

The inspiration for this pic came from a brochure I saw just before heading to Bermuda for a belated honeymoon. This magnificent hotel and its golf course are easily spotted on the Google Earth map. My wife and I had to dodge flying golf balls to get this pic, but it was worth the danger.

Lookabout Bay is well known for its sunsets and on each pleasant evening several people gather there in the hope of catching one like this. I used a zoom lens to capture the most intense part of the scene. The clouds here look as if our planet is situated beside some gas giant, like Jupiter.

For years I laboured under the notion that Hamilton was a small, ugly town covered in industrical pollution--but much of the city is quite scenic! It now advertises itself as the "City of Waterfalls," and that the city and its environs do indeed have plenty of waterfalls is perhaps one of Southern Ontario's best-kept secrets!

When I was at a MacTier cottage a few years ago, I saw awesome auroral displays every night for nearly a week. Every night the colours and patterns were different. This is a 30-second time exposure on a tripod-mounted camera using ISO 400 film.

I took this photo off of a dock at a MacTier cottage. These northern lights weren't actually green to the naked eye but whitish-gray; the camera film brought out the true colours.

I took this photo at the Torrence Barrens. This display of northern lights didn't look this way to the naked eye; it was fuzzy white, like a thin cloud. It took a few minutes for me to realize that I wasn't seeing clouds but an awesome auroral display. This is a 20- or 30-second time exposure on 400 ISO film. You can see the Big Dipper beyond the red stripe. The whole thing reminds me of a roll of Life-Savers.

Use a polarizing filter on your camera to cut through the glare and see what's under the surface of the water.

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