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J. Bearden - South Carolina

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Hi Marion

My pleasure I look forward to see your dog picture like this I think I used the Corel for this one can't remember but you can get free download to try if you want to go to www.corel.com Enjoy the experiment...Cheers Marion

Looks rather calm.

But the God has not forgotten them, he love 'em.

This was a busy Appalachian farmstead in the late 1800's and early 1900's. You could hear the laughter of children playing in the creek, lowing cattle and clucking chickens as they searched for food. Ganaway Russell built a small house here in 1867 and enlarged it three times over the next 40 years to accommodate his growing family and guests.

Folks lacked motels, air conditioners and automibiles like we enjoy today. Vacationers flocked to the area that is now Highlands, North Carolina to escape the hot South Carolina summers. Their train ride ended at Walhalla where they boarded a horse drawn stage coach for two hard days of bumpy riding on the dusty, unpaved roads. It was a welcome sight when they rounded the curve and spied the large house where the Russell Family provided overnight lodging and good home cooked meals for weary travelers. As many as 80 visitors are said to have stayed in the house at one time when the Chattooga was too deep to cross and folks had to wait several days, and more spent the evenings in tents and hammocks. The guests even included a future president, Woodrow Wilson.

Russell Farmstead This self-sufficient farmstead included ten outbuildings clustered around the main house. Barns sheltered stage coach teams and draft animals used on the farm. A

By Stanley and Terrie Howard, July 19, 2009

  1. Russell House

corn crib, sweet potato cellar, and smoke house permitted storing food grown on the farm until needed. Cattle and hogs provided meat while the rich soils along the Chattooga River produced abundant vegetables. The cooks frequently served more than 80 guests and reports say they ate as many as 20 turkeys at a single meal.

Many of life's necessities like shoes and metal items were made in the sheds and blacksmith shop. Follow the trail behind this sign to spring house that provided drinking water and served as a refrigerator for this proud family. A number of marriages were performed at the attractive location. A tragic fire destroyed the main house and three out buildings in 1988. The farmstead is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

The Russells William Ganaway Russell (B. 1835, D. 1921) helped drive a herd of cattle west to California and earned money selling meat to gold miners near Sacramento. He sewed his gold coins into a vest for the trip back home to avoid robbers and used the money to purchase this property. In addition to constructing these buildings he built and furnished Mill Creek School House a mile south of here for the many children living in this area.

William Ganaway Russell (B 1835 D 1921) helped drive a herd of cattle west to California and earned money selling meat to gold miners near Sacramento. He sewed his gold coins into a vest for the trip back home to avoid robbers and used the money to purchase this property. In addition to constructing these buildings he built and furnished Mill Creek School House a mile south of here for the many children living in this area. Ganaway married Jane Nicholson (B 1851 D 1935) who stayed busy running the inn, especially during the summer. Jane, in addition to raising 15 of their own children, was a midwife, riding a horse to provide help. She also ran a post office in the main house from the late 1800's to early 1900's.

What is the occasion? THe little girls with the flowers? I like the photo.

I wish that I could have taken advantage of those low lake levels and kayaked down from the Keowee dam.

你好雷克。你也要小心啊!hongwei

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