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Opened in 1956 this cemetery commemorates the American servicemen who died in World War II. It is run by the American Battle Monuments Commission. The cemetery dates from 1943 when it was opened as a temporary cemetery on 30.5 acres of land donated by the University of Cambridge. After the war it was selected as the only permanent American WWII military cemetery in the British Isles. About 42% of those temporarily interred in England and Northern Ireland during the war were reinterred here. The cemetery contains 3,809 headstones and the remains 3,812 of servicemen including airmen who died over Europe and sailors from the North Atlantic convoys. The inscribed Wall of the Missing records the names of 5,127 missing servicemen most of whom died in the Battle of the Atlantic or in the strategic air bombardment of Northwest Europe. A quiet and peaceful place and a fitting tribute to our American cousins without whom we would not have survived.

Yes Carl.....this is a very wide ranging issue.....our UK. towns and cities have the same situations....but, having said that...the one above..was an elderly local..../...Dave

Marvelous effect....... is the end result..one day soon....to have it completely covered ?

Love this photo, the four theatres in Shaftesbury Avenue with Queens still putting on the marvellous Les Miserables.

The iconic Tower Bridge.

See previous comments, The Shard is the tallest building, at 306 metres high, in the European Union. It is the second-tallest free-standing structure in the UK after the concrete tower at the Emley transmitting station. HMS Belfast, a floating museum, is of course, the former Royal Navy Light Cruiser launched in 1938 which saw action in World War II.

See previous pic. Here the team of volunteers can be seen at work.

See previous pic.

The much photographed iconic Tower.

The oft photographed "Dent" clock with new artwork. What it represents I've yet to ascertain. This clock is an exact replica of the original. In the 1980s a rich American planned to buy the original clock from British Rail for £250,000 but while being lowered it dropped and smashed! However the clock survived thanks to a railway engineer from Nottingham who, with the aid of a wheelbarrow and £25, he brought the parts home and painstakingly put it back together. the original clock now adorns the side of his barn! And not a lot of people know that!!!

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