Roy Pledger
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My name is Roy, I live at Otley in West Yorkshire and I am retired. I am not the best photographer and most of my pics depict the unusual.

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The Atholl Highlanders is a private infantry regiment in the employ of The Duke of Atholl based at Blair Atholl Castle. It is the only legal private army in Europe. It was formed in 1839 by the 6th Duke as a body guard and escorted Queen Victoria on her tour of Perthshire in 1842, following which the Queen granted the regiment with colours giving it official status. Although the regiment has never seen active service, many of its numbers served in the two World Wars. The Atholl Highlanders are now purely ceremonial and its 100 men, including pipes and drums, wear the Clan Murray tartan. The regiment’s officers are usually lairds from the surrounding area whilst the other ranks are mainly employed on the Atholl Estate. They parade at the Atholl Gathering at the end of May when they are inspected by the present Duke; and also march to the Braemar Games in September. The Duke also permits the regiment to parade on certain other occasions such as Royal visits and overseas tours.

The Atholl Highlanders is a private infantry regiment in the employ of The Duke of Atholl based at Blair Castle. It is the only legal private army in Europe. It was formed in 1839 by the 6th Duke as a body guard and escorted Queen Victoria on her tour of Perthshire in 1842, following which the Queen granted the regiment with colours giving it official status. Although the regiment has never seen active service, many of its numbers served in the two World Wars. The Atholl Highlanders are now purely ceremonial and its 100 men, including pipes and drums, wear the Clan Murray tartan. The regiment’s officers are usually lairds from the surrounding area whilst the other ranks are mainly employed on the Atholl Estate. They parade at the Atholl Gathering at the end of May when they are inspected by the present Duke; and also march to the Braemar Games in September. The Duke also permits the regiment to parade on certain other occasions such as Royal visits and overseas tours.

The Star Hotel in the High Street dates to the late 1700’s. This old inn, only 20 feet wide and 162 feet long, is listed in the Guiness Book of Records as being the world’s narrowest hotel.

Situated at the top of the High Street at Moffat is the Colvin Fountain with its ram, which signifies the importance of the local sheep farming industry. It was sculptured by William Brodie R.S.A who also sculptured Edinburgh's 'Greyfriars Bobby'. A curious thing about this sculpture is that the ram is missing its ears and has been since it was presented to the town in 1875 by William Colvin. "It has nae lugs" was the cry at the unveiling ceremony much to the embarrassment of the sculptor. A sheep racing event has been established in the town centre in August each year.

The Grade 11* listed Guildhall is a very fine half timbered 16th century building. The old Council Chamber and the Law Courts are supported on huge oak pillars. In the open butter market beneath can be seen a whipping post and restraints from former times. The stone built town lock up situated at one end may date to the late 14th century

The Grade 11* listed Guildhall is a very fine half timbered 16th century building. The old Council Chamber and the Law Courts are supported on huge oak pillars. In the open butter market beneath can be seen a whipping post and restraints from former times. The stone built town lock up situated at one end may date to the late 14th century

The lock-up at Llangollen is situated in Victoria Square, Regent Street, LL20 8ET and it dates to 1834. It was built as a lock-up and jailer's quarters on the ground floor with Magistrates' Room and Committee Room above. In 1872 the building was purchased by Charles Richards who altered it with an extension to create a Drill Hall and Armoury. It is a Grade 11 listed building.

The lock-up at Llangollen is situated in Victoria Square, Regent Street, LL20 8ET and it dates to 1834. It was built as a lock-up and jailer's quarters on the ground floor with Magistrates' Room and Committee Room above. In 1872 the building was purchased by Charles Richards who altered it with an extension to create a Drill Hall and Armoury. It is a Grade 11 listed building.

Devil’s Bridge is situated high above Aberystwyth on the edge of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales and is the terminus of the narrow gauge Vale of Rheidol Railway (1902). The hamlet gets its name from the bridge which crosses a deep 300feet gorge on the B4574 road, through which passes the tiny Mynach River. Legend has it that in the 11th century the Devil met up with an old lady who seemed to be somewhat upset. Apparently her cow had found its way across the river and she was unable to get it back. It had been too difficult for mortals to build a bridge at this spot, but The Devil told her that he would build a bridge over the river for her on condition that he would be able to keep the first living soul to cross his bridge and this was agreed. The next day the old woman found that there was indeed a bridge but instead of crossing it herself she sent her dog over instead and so the Devil was thwarted and the bridge has been known as The Devil’s ever since. This legend may be related to folk memory when it is thought that a dog was sacrificed when bridges were built to guard against the spirits of the river, or to protect the bridge from evil spirits and occurs in various parts of Britain and Europe. The original bridge (1075-1200) is still there but it is topped by a second stone carriage bridge (1753) and indeed by a third iron road bridge (1901) which now carries the B4574 road. A very unusual sight indeed.

Devil’s Bridge is situated high above Aberystwyth on the edge of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales and is the terminus of the narrow gauge Vale of Rheidol Railway (1902). The hamlet gets its name from the bridge which crosses a deep 300feet gorge on the B4574 road, through which passes the tiny Mynach River. Legend has it that in the 11th century the Devil met up with an old lady who seemed to be somewhat upset. Apparently her cow had found its way across the river and she was unable to get it back. It had been too difficult for mortals to build a bridge at this spot, but The Devil told her that he would build a bridge over the river for her on condition that he would be able to keep the first living soul to cross his bridge and this was agreed. The next day the old woman found that there was indeed a bridge but instead of crossing it herself she sent her dog over instead and so the Devil was thwarted and the bridge has been known as The Devil’s ever since. This legend may be related to folk memory when it is thought that a dog was sacrificed when bridges were built to guard against the spirits of the river, or to protect the bridge from evil spirits and occurs in various parts of Britain and Europe. The original bridge (1075-1200) is still there but it is topped by a second stone carriage bridge (1753) and indeed by a third iron road bridge (1901) which now carries the B4574 road. A very unusual sight indeed.

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