Roy Pledger
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My name is Roy, I live at Otley in West Yorkshire and I am retired. I am not the best photographer and most of my pics depict the unusual.

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The lock-up at Llangollen is situated in Victoria Square, Regent Street, LL20 8ET and it dates to 1834. It was built as a lock-up and jailer's quarters on the ground floor with Magistrates' Room and Committee Room above. In 1872 the building was purchased by Charles Richards who altered it with an extension to create a Drill Hall and Armoury. It is a Grade 11 listed building.

Devil’s Bridge is situated high above Aberystwyth on the edge of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales and is the terminus of the narrow gauge Vale of Rheidol Railway (1902). The hamlet gets its name from the bridge which crosses a deep 300feet gorge on the B4574 road, through which passes the tiny Mynach River. Legend has it that in the 11th century the Devil met up with an old lady who seemed to be somewhat upset. Apparently her cow had found its way across the river and she was unable to get it back. It had been too difficult for mortals to build a bridge at this spot, but The Devil told her that he would build a bridge over the river for her on condition that he would be able to keep the first living soul to cross his bridge and this was agreed. The next day the old woman found that there was indeed a bridge but instead of crossing it herself she sent her dog over instead and so the Devil was thwarted and the bridge has been known as The Devil’s ever since. This legend may be related to folk memory when it is thought that a dog was sacrificed when bridges were built to guard against the spirits of the river, or to protect the bridge from evil spirits and occurs in various parts of Britain and Europe. The original bridge (1075-1200) is still there but it is topped by a second stone carriage bridge (1753) and indeed by a third iron road bridge (1901) which now carries the B4574 road. A very unusual sight indeed.

Devil’s Bridge is situated high above Aberystwyth on the edge of the Cambrian Mountains in Wales and is the terminus of the narrow gauge Vale of Rheidol Railway (1902). The hamlet gets its name from the bridge which crosses a deep 300feet gorge on the B4574 road, through which passes the tiny Mynach River. Legend has it that in the 11th century the Devil met up with an old lady who seemed to be somewhat upset. Apparently her cow had found its way across the river and she was unable to get it back. It had been too difficult for mortals to build a bridge at this spot, but The Devil told her that he would build a bridge over the river for her on condition that he would be able to keep the first living soul to cross his bridge and this was agreed. The next day the old woman found that there was indeed a bridge but instead of crossing it herself she sent her dog over instead and so the Devil was thwarted and the bridge has been known as The Devil’s ever since. This legend may be related to folk memory when it is thought that a dog was sacrificed when bridges were built to guard against the spirits of the river, or to protect the bridge from evil spirits and occurs in various parts of Britain and Europe. The original bridge (1075-1200) is still there but it is topped by a second stone carriage bridge (1753) and indeed by a third iron road bridge (1901) which now carries the B4574 road. A very unusual sight indeed.

The mystery of the third leg:

Sir Richard Pembridge who died in 1375, fought at the battles of Crecy and Poitiers and was made a Knight of the Garter by King Edward 111. His epitaph is a fine alabaster tomb and effigy in Hereford Cathedral. Originally the effigy correctly showed him wearing the Garter insignia only on his left leg. However, following damage during the Civil War, the right leg was replaced, but the wooden replacement wrongly included the garter. In the 19th century the wooden replacement was replaced by a new alabaster leg without the garter, and the incorrect wooden leg now stands nearby.

The mystery of the third leg :

Sir Richard Pembridge who died in 1375, fought at the battles of Crecy and Poitiers and was made a Knight of the Garter by King Edward 111. His epitaph is a fine alabaster tomb and effigy in Hereford Cathedral. Originally the effigy correctly showed him wearing the Garter insignia only on his left leg. However, following damage during the Civil War, the right leg was replaced, but the wooden replacement wrongly included the garter. In the 19th century the wooden replacement was replaced by a new alabaster leg without the garter, and the incorrect wooden leg now stands nearby.

Following the collapse of the older church in 1788, St Chad’s Church at Shrewsbury was built 1790-92, incorporating Classical Greek features. The site and plan caused much controversy as circular churches were unfamiliar in England and furthermore part of the town walls had to be demolished. A simple grave slab in the churchyard declares it to be that of Ebenezer Scrooge and it is indeed a fake. In fact it was a film prop when the church was featured in the film ‘Christmas Carol’ which was filmed in Shrewsbury and the crew left it in situe.

Following the collapse of the older church in 1788, St Chad’s Church at Shrewsbury was built 1790-92, incorporating Classical Greek features. The site and plan caused much controversy as circular churches were unfamiliar in England and furthermore part of the town walls had to be demolished. A simple grave slab in the churchyard declares it to be that of Ebenezer Scrooge and it is indeed a fake. In fact it was a film prop when the church was featured in the film ‘Christmas Carol’ which was filmed in Shrewsbury and the crew left it in situe.

Following the collapse of the older church in 1788, St Chad’s Church at Shrewsbury was built 1790-92, incorporating Classical Greek features. The site and plan caused much controversy as circular churches were unfamiliar in England and furthermore part of the town walls had to be demolished. A simple grave slab in the churchyard declares it to be that of Ebenezer Scrooge and it is indeed a fake. In fact it was a film prop when the church was featured in the film ‘Christmas Carol’ which was filmed in Shrewsbury and the crew left it in situe.

Thanks Andy. Nice to hear your tale of yore. Best wishes, Roy.

Between 1788 and 1862 an unusual weather vane graced the top of the spire of St Peter’s church in the shape of a huge key, a symbol of St Peter. The vane was removed in 1862 during George Gilbert Scott’s renovations and is now preserved inside the church.

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