Roy Pledger
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My name is Roy, I live at Otley in West Yorkshire and I am retired. I am not the best photographer and most of my pics depict the unusual.

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Tablets set into the wall of the churchyard at Great Wishford in Wiltshire record the price of bread since 1800. In 1800 it was 3s/4d per gallon. In 1801 it was 3s/10d per gallon. In 1904 it was 10d per gallon. In 1920 it was 2s/8d per gallon – after the Great War. In 1946 – 48 bread was rationed. Subsidised price was 2s/1d per gallon. In 1965 it was 5s/4d per gallon. In 1971 it was 8/- per gallon – 40p decimal. In 1984 it was £1.80 per gallon. In 2000 it was £372 per gallon.

Hovis is synonymous with brown bread. Gold Hill in the ancient Dorset town of Shaftesbury, will long be associated with the T.V commercial for Hovis and a huge plastic Hovis loaf can be seen at the top of the hill.

Hovis is synonymous with brown bread. Gold Hill in the ancient Dorset town of Shaftesbury, will long be associated with the T.V commercial for Hovis and a huge plastic Hovis loaf can be seen at the top of the hill. The town was founded by King Alfred and King Canute died there in 1035.

The original fish and chip shop is preserved behind the present premises.

The elegant interior.

The elegant interior.

One of the pie dishes has been preserved outside The Pie Hall as a flower bed.

The small village of Denby Dale near Huddersfield is known as the ‘Pie Village’ as a result of its long tradition of baking huge celebratory pies. The very first pie was made in 1788 to celebrate George 111’s recovery from mental illness. No.2 was to celebrate Victory at Waterloo. No3. celebrated the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846. No.4 was baked to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Jubilee in 1887, but sadly this time the pie went bad and had to be buried in a nearby wood. However, within one week a ‘resurrection pie’ was produced as No.5. No.6 celebrated the Corn Law Jubilee in 1896. In 1928 it was resolved to bake a pie to raise money for the endowment of a bed at Huddersfield Royal Infirmary and so ‘The Infirmary Pie’ became No.7. The next pie, No.8 was to raise money for the pensioner’s Community Centre. This ‘Darby and Joan Pie’ was baked in 1964 and the pie dish, 18 feet long, can be seen in front of the Pie Hall in the village main street, where it has been planted with flowers. 3,000 kilo’s of beef, 3,000 kilo’s of potatoes and 700 kilo’s of onions, were the ingredients for Pie No.9 in 1988 and pie No.10 ‘The Millennium Pie was baked in the year 2000.

The following is taken from thefalkirkwheel.co.uk/history: Millennium Link was an ambitious £84.5m project with the objective of restoring navigability across Scotland on the historic Forth & Clyde and Union Canals, providing a corridor of regenerative activity through central Scotland. (taken from the falkirkwheel.co.uk/history) A major challenge faced, was to link the Forth and Clyde Canal, which lay 35m (115ft) below the level of the Union Canal. Historically, the two canals had been joined at Falkirk by a flight of 11 locks that stepped down across a distance of 1.5km, but these has been dismantled in 1933, breaking the link. What was required was a method of connecting these two canals by way of a boat lift. British Waterways were keen to present a visionary solution taking full advantage of the opportunity to create a truly spectacular and fitting structure that would suitably commemorate the Millennium and act as an iconic symbol for years to come. The result, a perfectly balanced structure that is The Falkirk Wheel - the world's first and only rotating boat lift.

Sited at Morton Park alongside the A66 at Darlington, this huge model, loosely based on the famous steam train, The Mallard, used 185,000 bricks, at a cost of £750,000, to build. Commissioned in 1997, by Morrisons Supermarkets and Darlington Council and supported by lottery and other funding, this 120 feet long sculpture was designed by David Mach, to commemorate the world’s first scheduled railway service between Darlington and Stockton. It is a major feat of design and engineering depicting a steam train emerging from a tunnel in the hillside, and was so constructed as to be a suitable habitat for bats.

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