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Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Datura Brugmansia suaveolens WHITE ANGEL'S TRUMPET Synonym: Datura gardneri, Datura suaveolens. Southeastern Brazil; widely naturalized. Evergreen shrub or tree, 8-12 ft.; zones 10-11. Blooms intermittently in warm months. Regular moisture and humidity when hot, less when cool. Average, well-drained soil. Part sun to bright filtered light. Flowers: white to peach, funnel-shaped, to 10 in. long, obliquely pendent, lobe spurs short; mildly fragrant (hence suaveolens); calyx 3- to 5-toothed, loose-fitting, the corolla neck extends beyond the end of the calyx. Leaves: lanceolate, 8-10 in. long, glabrous to minutely pubescent. Of coastal rainforest. Does not produce double flowers (see xcandidaj (Tristram 1998). Flowers shorter than B. versicolor and not fully pendent.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Ficus includes 500-800 species of deciduous or evergreen trees, shrubs, and climbers widely distributed in the tropics, with great diversity in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Flowers are reduced, unisexual, enclosed inside a fleshy receptacle (syconium) more commonly known as a fig. Tiny, species-specific gall-wasp pollinators enter the figs through a porelike opening at the end. The fruits are often cauliflorous, or rarely, subterranean. The sap is a white latex. Ficus fruits are an important source of food for animals. At one time a number of Ficus species were grown for rubber latex, principally F. elastica, India or Assam rubber, and F. lutea, Congo rubber. These species have been largely replaced by Para rubber Hevea brasiliensis (Euphorbiaceae). Leaves are entire or occasionally lobed. Some trees have adventitious aerial or adhering roots. Many are fast-growing with aggressive, superficial root systems that can heave pavement and foundations and invade septic systems. They are top-heavy and inclined to topple in windstorms. Large species are unsuitable for the average garden or street landscaping. Some, including the Florida native Ficus aurea, are invasive. Indian laurel, F. microcarpa, is prohibited in Florida. Boundary hedges of ficus and other potentially massive plants do not make good neighbors and are strongly discouraged. These plants require frequent and costly maintenance, and the roots are invasive. Between homes they put an uninvited burden on neighbors who did not ask for the considerable expense of maintaining their side of the hedge. For privacy, plant shrubs of moderate height such as Ligustrum species, Megaskepasma erythrochlamys, or Thunbergia erecta. To disguise a fence, cover it with flowering vines (mutual agreement strongly suggested). Otherwise set hedges away from property lines where the owner can maintain both sides.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Ficus includes 500-800 species of deciduous or evergreen trees, shrubs, and climbers widely distributed in the tropics, with great diversity in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Flowers are reduced, unisexual, enclosed inside a fleshy receptacle (syconium) more commonly known as a fig. Tiny, species-specific gall-wasp pollinators enter the figs through a porelike opening at the end. The fruits are often cauliflorous, or rarely, subterranean. The sap is a white latex. Ficus fruits are an important source of food for animals. At one time a number of Ficus species were grown for rubber latex, principally F. elastica, India or Assam rubber, and F. lutea, Congo rubber. These species have been largely replaced by Para rubber Hevea brasiliensis (Euphorbiaceae). Leaves are entire or occasionally lobed. Some trees have adventitious aerial or adhering roots. Many are fast-growing with aggressive, superficial root systems that can heave pavement and foundations and invade septic systems. They are top-heavy and inclined to topple in windstorms. Large species are unsuitable for the average garden or street landscaping. Some, including the Florida native Ficus aurea, are invasive. Indian laurel, F. microcarpa, is prohibited in Florida. Boundary hedges of ficus and other potentially massive plants do not make good neighbors and are strongly discouraged. These plants require frequent and costly maintenance, and the roots are invasive. Between homes they put an uninvited burden on neighbors who did not ask for the considerable expense of maintaining their side of the hedge. For privacy, plant shrubs of moderate height such as Ligustrum species, Megaskepasma erythrochlamys, or Thunbergia erecta. To disguise a fence, cover it with flowering vines (mutual agreement strongly suggested). Otherwise set hedges away from property lines where the owner can maintain both sides.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Ficus includes 500-800 species of deciduous or evergreen trees, shrubs, and climbers widely distributed in the tropics, with great diversity in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Flowers are reduced, unisexual, enclosed inside a fleshy receptacle (syconium) more commonly known as a fig. Tiny, species-specific gall-wasp pollinators enter the figs through a porelike opening at the end. The fruits are often cauliflorous, or rarely, subterranean. The sap is a white latex. Ficus fruits are an important source of food for animals. At one time a number of Ficus species were grown for rubber latex, principally F. elastica, India or Assam rubber, and F. lutea, Congo rubber. These species have been largely replaced by Para rubber Hevea brasiliensis (Euphorbiaceae). Leaves are entire or occasionally lobed. Some trees have adventitious aerial or adhering roots. Many are fast-growing with aggressive, superficial root systems that can heave pavement and foundations and invade septic systems. They are top-heavy and inclined to topple in windstorms. Large species are unsuitable for the average garden or street landscaping. Some, including the Florida native Ficus aurea, are invasive. Indian laurel, F. microcarpa, is prohibited in Florida. Boundary hedges of ficus and other potentially massive plants do not make good neighbors and are strongly discouraged. These plants require frequent and costly maintenance, and the roots are invasive. Between homes they put an uninvited burden on neighbors who did not ask for the considerable expense of maintaining their side of the hedge. For privacy, plant shrubs of moderate height such as Ligustrum species, Megaskepasma erythrochlamys, or Thunbergia erecta. To disguise a fence, cover it with flowering vines (mutual agreement strongly suggested). Otherwise set hedges away from property lines where the owner can maintain both sides.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Ficus includes 500-800 species of deciduous or evergreen trees, shrubs, and climbers widely distributed in the tropics, with great diversity in India, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Flowers are reduced, unisexual, enclosed inside a fleshy receptacle (syconium) more commonly known as a fig. Tiny, species-specific gall-wasp pollinators enter the figs through a porelike opening at the end. The fruits are often cauliflorous, or rarely, subterranean. The sap is a white latex. Ficus fruits are an important source of food for animals. At one time a number of Ficus species were grown for rubber latex, principally F. elastica, India or Assam rubber, and F. lutea, Congo rubber. These species have been largely replaced by Para rubber Hevea brasiliensis (Euphorbiaceae). Leaves are entire or occasionally lobed. Some trees have adventitious aerial or adhering roots. Many are fast-growing with aggressive, superficial root systems that can heave pavement and foundations and invade septic systems. They are top-heavy and inclined to topple in windstorms. Large species are unsuitable for the average garden or street landscaping. Some, including the Florida native Ficus aurea, are invasive. Indian laurel, F. microcarpa, is prohibited in Florida. Boundary hedges of ficus and other potentially massive plants do not make good neighbors and are strongly discouraged. These plants require frequent and costly maintenance, and the roots are invasive. Between homes they put an uninvited burden on neighbors who did not ask for the considerable expense of maintaining their side of the hedge. For privacy, plant shrubs of moderate height such as Ligustrum species, Megaskepasma erythrochlamys, or Thunbergia erecta. To disguise a fence, cover it with flowering vines (mutual agreement strongly suggested). Otherwise set hedges away from property lines where the owner can maintain both sides.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: African Mask Alocasia xamazonica Garden hybrid, A sanderiana x A. longiloba var. grandis. Evergreen herb; zones 10-11. Blooms warm months. Regular moisture and humidity. Fertile, sandy, humus-rich, well-drained soil. Medium to bright filtered light. Flowers: unisexual. Leaves: sagittate, 1-2 ft. long, to 1 ft. wide, basal lobes large and pointed, dark green; veins white, widely spaced; margins white with large teeth; peltate.

Text by KIRSTEN ALBRECHT LLAMAS: Alocasia longiloba Synonym: A lowii. Borneo. Evergreen herb to 2.5 ft.; zones 10-11. Blooms warm months. Regular moisture and humidity. Fertile, sandy, humus-rich, well-drained soil. Medium to bright filtered light. Flowers: unisexual. Leaves: sagittate, to 2 ft. long, basal lobes long and pointed, blade silvery dark green with feathery white veins; margins undulate; peltate

Ficus elastica (caoutchouc) Texte wikipedia: Le caoutchouc est un grand arbre du groupe des figuiers banyan, à croissance rapide, pouvant atteindre 30 à 40 mètres de haut (plus rarement 60 mètres) dans son habitat naturel des jungles d'Asie tropicale mais dépassant rarement 12 m ailleurs. Il a un tronc solide et irrégulier, jusqu'à 2 mètres de diamètre, qui émet de nombreuses racines aériennes qui vont s'ancrer dans le sol, lui servant de contreforts et contribuant ainsi à supporter le poids de ses lourdes branches. Les grandes feuilles alternes, ovales, lustrées, coriaces et à marge entière mesurent de 10 à 35 cm de long par 5 à 15 cm de large. La taille des feuilles est plus grande chez les jeunes plantes (jusqu'à 45 cm de long) mais beaucoup plus petite chez les arbres âgés (en moyenne 10 cm de long). Les feuilles se développent à l'intérieur d'un fourreau au méristème apical, qui grossit au fur et à mesure que la nouvelle feuille croît. Quand elle atteint son complet développement, elle se déploie et le fourreau tombe. À l'intérieur de la nouvelle feuille, une autre feuille immature est en attente de développement. Comme c'est le cas chez d'autres espèces du genre Ficus, la pollinisation des fleurs nécessite une espèce particulière de guêpes inféodée à la plante dans une relation coévolutive. À cause de cette inféodation, le caoutchouc ne produit pas de fleurs très colorées ou odorantes pour attirer d'autres pollinisateurs. Les petites inflorescences ovoïdes d'un jaune verdâtre appelées « sycones », enveloppées de bractées protectrices, apparaissent par paires à l'aisselle des feuilles des arbres matures à longueur d'année. À maturité, les petites figues, pas vraiment comestibles, mesurent à peine 1-2 cm de long. Ce sont de faux-fruits qui ne contiennent de graines fertiles que dans les zones où l'insecte pollinisateur est présent.

bob scaff,

Picture of the day (Avatar September 14. 2014) in my group Flower Power ! ♥ Like&fav♥ Friendly greetings from moni

Gracias,

  • Kamalakar

  • Biplab

por vuestra visita y amables comentarios.

Saludos cordiales.
Antonio.

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